ammonia gas detection Applications

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Gas Detection Solutions for Fertilizer Manufacturing

by Boreal Laser Inc.     based in Edmonton, ALBERTA (CANADA)

Ammonia is a notoriously difficult compound to measure accurately and reliably using standard chemical sampling techniques. The great advantage of the optical laser gas detection technique for quantitative ammonia monitoring is that the optical measurement does not affect the air being sampled – and so a true, undisturbed value for ammonia concentration can be determined. The very high resolution and specificity of the laser method also means that is no interference from other gases in the air (for example, water vapor) – such interferences complicate other optical techniques using IR or UV.

Gas Detection Solutions for Power Generation Industry

by Boreal Laser Inc.     based in Edmonton, ALBERTA (CANADA)

Boreal possess an array of products for the power generation industry from emissions stack monitoring, boiler room monitoring, chloride leak detection, and ammonia slip in deNOX. Boreal’s products are tailor made for coal fired power plants, natural gas fired, and waste-to-energy. Whether gas detection is used for safety, process, or environmental reasons, Boreal has you covered.

Gas Detection Solutions for Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) Safety

by Boreal Laser Inc.     based in Edmonton, ALBERTA (CANADA)

Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is a very useful chemical used in a variety of industries. However, HF is highly toxic with potential fatal consequences with exposure to humans, so facilities that make or use HF should exercise great care. Nevertheless, there is always the risk of leaks from process elements such as valves, pump seals and storage vessels. Tanker loading, transporting and unloading operations also provide opportunity for HF releases. Industrial processes that make or use HF typically have arrays of point sensors distributed throughout the unit. However, these sensors are maintenance intensive and have relatively slow response times. In addition, a point sensor will not detect an HF release unless it is located directly in the area of that release. Electrochemical HF sensors also respond to chlorine, ammonia, and sulfur dioxide, resulting in false alarms.

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