biofilm testing Applications

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Cooling Tower, algae and biofilm control

by LG Sonic     based in Zoetermeer, NETHERLANDS

“Efficiently lowers algae, biofilm formation, bacterial counts and chemical consumption.” When temperatures are high, for example in cooling towers, a matrix of different microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, EPS and algae can grow very rapidly. The disadvantages of biofilm formation in cooling towers can be enormous. Therefore water used in cooling towers needs frequent treatment and chemical shocks to keep levels of micro-organisms to a minimum.

Reduce biofilm formation

by LG Sonic     based in Zoetermeer, NETHERLANDS

In many industrial or professional applications where water is being stored, biofilm may grow. The growth of biofilm can damage the installations and reduce efficiency of the circuit. A biofilm can grow certain substrates which can be found in water. When temperatures are high, for example in cooling towers, a matrix of different micro- organisms such as bacteria, fungi, algae can grow very rapidly causing the formation of a biofilm on certain surfaces submerge in water. During the formation of this biofilm, certain micro organisms starts producing extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS) which reinforce the biofilm structure.

Microbial testing in cooling water system industry

by LuminUltra Technologies Ltd.     based in Fredericton, NEW BRUNSWICK (CANADA)

Superior reliability for superior control! Biocide treatments are essential to control microbiological growth in cooling systems. If not properly managed, the warm environments of cooling systems are ideal for the growth of microorganisms. As microorganism communities grow in cooling systems, they can attach to pipe walls and form biofilms. These biofilms pose serious risks, from human health risks like Legionnaire`s disease to reduced operating efficiency and eventually to equipment failure via microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Monitoring of Algal Production / Monitoring of Algae Growth

by Chelsea Technologies Group     based in West Molesey, UNITED KINGDOM

Over the past 20 years active fluorescence has been widely adopted by the scientific community, ecosystem managers and crop growers as a rapid and non-invasive method of estimating photosynthetic performance within a wide range of organisms, including phytoplankton (microalgae and cyanobacteria), biofilms, benthic autotrophs (corals, macroalgae and sea grasses) and terrestrial plants. The main rational for applying active fluorescence is that changes in key fluorescence parameters can reveal the early onset of chronic and acute degradation of photosynthetic performance and subsequent growth, e.g. resulting from nutrient deficiency or the presence on one or more toxicants.

Over the past 15 years we have been developing an active fluorescence technique called Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometry to monitor algae populations in the open-ocean, primarily to support climate and ocean modelling.

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