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biogas bacteria Applications

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    Gas analysis & monitoring system for biogas analysis

    “Biogas” means a mixture of various types of gas (mostly methane) produced by bacterial fermentation in anaerobic conditions(absence of oxygen) of organic residues from waste, decaying plant, carcasses in putrescence. The analyzers of biogas by Infrared cells carry out the continuous analysis of CH4, O2, CO2, H2S and NH3. The whole process sees the decomposition of organic material by some types of bacteria, producing carbon dioxide, molecular hydrogen and methane(methane conversion of organic compounds).

    By ETG Risorse e Tecnologia based in Montiglio, ITALY.

  • Ozone Water Treatment for Activated Sludge Process Plants

    Ozone breaks up filaments and improves settling characteristics of the sludge... Filamentous sludge is a common problem at activated sludge plants. With ozonation of the return sludge flow it is possible to reduced the amount of filamentous bacteria in the sludge and significantly increased the settling properties of the sludge.This in turn means better performance of the activated sludge process. When a bioreactor is connected to the sludge line the removal of the damaging filamentous bacteria means higher quality sludge in the bioreactor, which leads to higher biogas production.

    By Primozone Production AB based in Löddeköpinge, SWEDEN.

  • Wastewater treatment solutions for anaerobic sludge digestion sector

    Anaerobic digestion is a series of processes in which microorganisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen, used for industrial or domestic purposes to manage waste and/or to release energy. It is widely used as part of the process to treat wastewater, like Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors. As part of an integrated waste management system, anaerobic digestion reduces the emission of landfill gas into the atmosphere. Anaerobic digestion is widely used as a renewable energy source because the process produces a methane and carbon dioxide rich biogas suitable for energy production, helping to replace fossil fuels. The nutrient-rich digestate which is also produced can be used as fertilizer. The digestion process begins with bacterial hydrolysis of the input materials in order to break down insoluble organic polymers such as carbohydrates and make them available for other bacteria. Acidogenic bacteria then convert the sugars and amino acids into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, ammonia, and organic acids. Acetogenic bacteria then convert these resulting organic acids into acetic acid, along with additional ammonia, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Finally, methanogens convert these products to methane and carbon dioxide.

    By QM Environmental Services Ltd. based in The Hague, NETHERLANDS.

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