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coal combustion Applications

  • Coal Combustion Residuals Disposal for Power Plants

    Coal combustion residuals (CCR) are generated during the power generation process and can include fly ash, bottom ash, boilerslag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residuals. CCRs contain trace concentrations of heavy metals and therefore cannot be dumped or stored where rainwater can leach the metals. Liner systems can be used to contain the coal combustion by-products and protect them from leaching into the environment.

    By CETCO based in Hoffman Estates, ILLINOIS (USA).

  • Combustible Aluminium, Titanium and Magnesium Dust Collection

    The consequences of an industrial dust explosion or fire are unthinkable - worker injury, loss of life, property damage, business interruption, and irreversible environmental harm. Few companies realize how many diverse and common industrial applications produce combustible particulates, or where in their facilities this catastrophic threat is settling. What is a combustible dust? “A combustible particulate solid that presents a fire or deflagration hazard when suspended in air or other oxidizing medium over a range of concentrations, regardless of particle size or shape” – NFPA 654? High Risk Applications Metalwork (aluminum, magnesium, or titanium and others) – cutting, grinding, or finishing Ceramics – raw product handling and enamel spray Chemicals – material handling, crushing, grinding, roasters, kilns, and coolers Coal mining – material handling, de-dusting, drying, air cleaning Food (flour, sugar, and others) – mixing, grinding, blending, bagging, and packaging Foundry – sand handling, tumbling mills, abrasive cleaning, and shakeout Pharmaceutical – mixing, grinding, blending, bagging, and packaging Rubber – mixing, grinding, talc dusting, de-dusting, and batch-out rolls Woodwork – woodworking machines, sanding, waste conveying?

    By DiversiTech based in Montreal, QUEBEC (CANADA).

  • Primary air control for coal-fired power plants

    Power Generation Combustion Air Measurements: The need for accurate, repeatable & reliable combustion air measurements in power generation plants is critical to efficient operation and safety throughout the entire facility and processes. Coal-fired power plant applications pose a number of challenges to obtaining these critical flow measurements includ¬ing large ducts, limited metering runs, poor velocity and temperature profiles, high vibration, temperatures up to 750° F and dirty `Fly Ash` laden air.

    By Kurz Instruments, Inc. based in Monterey, CALIFORNIA (USA).

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    Gas monitoring and dust monitoring for the powerplants industry

    LaserGas measurements

    • Boiler combustion control, O2 and CO
    • DeNOx system, NH3 and NO
    • Electrostatic precipitators (ESP), CO monitoring for explosion prevention
    • Stack gas emissions, NH3, H2O, NO
    • Coal silos, CO monitoring for explosion prevention and detection of smouldering fires (only in coal fired plants)

    LaserDust measurements

    • Stack gas emission
    • Coal silo, explosion prevention

    By NEO Monitors AS based in Skedsmokorset, NORWAY.

  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) monitoring

    Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is the product of the combustion of sulfur compounds and causes significant environmental pollution. The main source of sulfur dioxide SO2 in the environment are from various industrial processes such as the burning of coal in power stations, the extraction of metals from ore and combustion of fuel within automobiles.

    By Ecotech Pty Ltd based in Knoxfield, AUSTRALIA.

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    Gas Sensing for Gasification

    Syngas (short for synthetic gas) can be burnt and used as a fuel source, the main constituents of syngas are Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrogen (H), which amount for around 85% of Syngas, and it is produced by a process called Gasification. Gasification starts with a base material which can originate from a wide variety of materials for example wood chips and pellets, plastics, municipal solid waste, sewage, waste crops, and fossil fuels such as coal. During Gasification the base material is reacted at high temperature without combustion with controlled amounts of oxygen (O) or steam. The composition of the base material combined with the amount of oxygen and heat used in the process affects the composition of the resultant SynGas, in which the CO can vary between around 20 and 60%. In addition, large amounts of H and CO are also formed. The measurement of CO is therefore an important feature in the production of SynGas.

    By Edinburgh Instruments Ltd based in Livingston, UNITED KINGDOM.

  • Opacity monitoring for continuous emissions

    The history of air pollution regulation dates back as far as the 13th century when in 1273, Edward I (Longshanks) of England prohibited the burning of sea coal in London. The smoke produced by its combustion was considered detrimental to human health. By the late 19th and early 20th centuries, regulations were being passed that sought to control air pollution predominantly for smoke and odour control. Traditionally, regulators were concerned with the visual impact of the discharge from a stack or chimney. Therefore, emission limits were expressed in terms of colour or opacity. Modern methods for opacity measurement still use the darkness of the stack gases to measure the amount of smoke or dust emitted within the exhaust gases.

    By DynOptic Systems Ltd based in Brackley, UNITED KINGDOM.

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