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desalination waste Applications

  • Using evaporation to dewater Reverse Osmosis reject waste streams

    Reverse Osmosis (RO) technology has been used for years in various industries to separate dissolved solids from water by forcing the water through a semi-permeable membrane. RO is also commonly used to purify drinking water and desalinate seawater to yield potable water. The water and other molecules with lower molecular weight (specific weight of molecules allowed to pass through is dependent on the selected membrane) pass through the micropores in the membrane, yielding a purified water stream called the permeate. Larger molecules are retained by the membrane as well as a portion of the water that does not pass through the membrane. This concentrated stream is called the concentrate or RO reject.

    By ENCON Evaporators based in Hooksett, NEW HAMPSHIRE (USA).

  • Water treatment research for refining and petrochemicals industry

    Refining processes like distillation use high quality steam that must be generated from ultrapure water. Advanced wastewater treatment technologies will help the industry meet tough regulations concerning hazardous waste products from process operations. As the industry expands into water-scarce areas in India, China and the Middle East, marginal sources can help meet the demand for water. Desalination and reuse technologies will secure a reliable source of water and help the industry manage its water impact. Water technology suppliers have the opportunity to tap into a market worth $768 billion.

    By Global Water Intelligence (GWI) based in Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM.

  • Water treatment research for food and beverage industry

    Direct reuse of wastewater in the product is not on the menu in the food and beverage industry, but the reuse of water for other purposes (e.g. washing) is now a priority. Most major F&B companies have made commitments to reduce their water consumption per unit of product, and reuse is an important part of the strategy for achieving this. Furthermore much of the growth of the industry is in emerging markets which typically have more limited, lower quality water resources than developed countries, creating water treatment challenges. In developed markets, emerging concerns about pharmaceutical by-products and other trace contaminants making their way into the product have lead to greater use of desalination technologies on the process water side. Value from waste propositions such as energy recovery, water reuse (not within the product) and materials recovery ensure that investment in water technology benefits the bottom line.

    By Global Water Intelligence (GWI) based in Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM.

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