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fossil fuel combustion Applications

  • Combustion measurement for engines

    Combustion processes occur in many modern technologies such as power production, heating, automotive and aircraft engines and even explosion research.

    The application areas range from fuel injection and mixing and flow velocity information to measurements of combustion species and soot concentration.

    Because of the impact on the global climate and the limited resources of fossil fuels, the importance of these applications is increasing, especially with respect to performance, fuel economy and CO2 emissions.

    By Dantec Dynamics based in Skovlunde, DENMARK.

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    Reliable Shredding Technology for Refuse Derived Fuels (RDF)

    Our shredding solutions enable you to optimally recycle waste into substitute fuels / alternative fuels and ensure high quality by producing a homogeneous granulate free of foreign objects. The goal of recycling is to use the valuable energy contained in the waste and to substitute the use of fossil fuels. During the recycling process the portions with a high calorific value are separated from the commercial and industrial waste and turned into a marketable product. Depending on the calorific value and the granular size, these fuels are used in fluidised bed combustion, cement plants and substitute fuel power plants.

    By UNTHA Shredding Technology based in Kuchl, AUSTRIA.

  • Carbon Dioxide (CO2) monitoring

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted in a number of ways. It is emitted naturally and through human activities like the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels or the burning of vegetable matter, among other chemical processes. Small amounts of carbon dioxide are emitted from volcanoes and other geothermal processes.

    By Ecotech Pty Ltd based in Knoxfield, AUSTRALIA.

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    Gas Sensing for Gasification

    Syngas (short for synthetic gas) can be burnt and used as a fuel source, the main constituents of syngas are Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrogen (H), which amount for around 85% of Syngas, and it is produced by a process called Gasification. Gasification starts with a base material which can originate from a wide variety of materials for example wood chips and pellets, plastics, municipal solid waste, sewage, waste crops, and fossil fuels such as coal. During Gasification the base material is reacted at high temperature without combustion with controlled amounts of oxygen (O) or steam. The composition of the base material combined with the amount of oxygen and heat used in the process affects the composition of the resultant SynGas, in which the CO can vary between around 20 and 60%. In addition, large amounts of H and CO are also formed. The measurement of CO is therefore an important feature in the production of SynGas.

    By Edinburgh Instruments Ltd based in Livingston, UNITED KINGDOM.

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