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microalgae Applications

  • Production of Biofuels from Microalgae

    Production of biofuels from certain microalgae and cyanobacteria would appear to be the most promising alternative to current methods, since its yield is very high, sustainable, uses either wastewater, brackish or seawater, does not require the use of agricultural land, does not compete with human food and the cultivation process consumes the CO2noxious gas.

    ALGAENERGY is responsibly paving the way towards making microalgal-based biofuels industrially profitable.  The R&D projects assigned to this task include work on selection and genetic engineering of different microalgae to produce substantial lipid-carriers, some of them patented, as well as the establishment of a suitable and scalable production process.

    By AlgaEnergy, S.A. based in Alcobendas, SPAIN.

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    Wastewater solutions for ballast water treatment monitoring

    Problem: To operate safely and efficiently, cargo ships take in water to provide stability. This water, referred to as ballast, carries all kinds of bacteria, microbes and micro-algae. The ballast water must inevitably be discharged when the ship takes on cargo, often thousands of kilometers away from the port of origin, transferring pathogens and aquatic organisms that can cause serious environmental, economic and health problems.

    By Real Tech Inc. based in Whitby, ONTARIO (CANADA).

  • Monitoring of Algal Production / Monitoring of Algae Growth

    Over the past 20 years active fluorescence has been widely adopted by the scientific community, ecosystem managers and crop growers as a rapid and non-invasive method of estimating photosynthetic performance within a wide range of organisms, including phytoplankton (microalgae and cyanobacteria), biofilms, benthic autotrophs (corals, macroalgae and sea grasses) and terrestrial plants. The main rational for applying active fluorescence is that changes in key fluorescence parameters can reveal the early onset of chronic and acute degradation of photosynthetic performance and subsequent growth, e.g. resulting from nutrient deficiency or the presence on one or more toxicants.

    Over the past 15 years we have been developing an active fluorescence technique called Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometry to monitor algae populations in the open-ocean, primarily to support climate and ocean modelling.

    By Chelsea Technologies Group based in West Molesey, UNITED KINGDOM.

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