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odor from wastewater treatment Applications

  • Odor Scrubbers Applications with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Hydrogen Peroxide as a Replacement for Sodium Hypochlorite Hydrogen peroxide may be used in both mist scrubbers and packed tower scrubbers as a replacement for sodium hypochlorite (bleach). Like bleach, the process involves two concurrent mechanisms: 1) absorption of the odors (H2S) into the alkaline scrubbing solution; and 2) oxidation of the absorbed sulfide in solution. Step 1: H2S + NaOH → NaSH + H2O Step 2: 4H2O2 + H2S → H2SO4 + 4H2O Typical dose ratios are 5 parts H2O2 per part H2S or, when used in place of bleach, one gallon 50% H2O2 for every 10 gallons of 15% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). This generally translates into a break-even cost scenario. Sufficient caustic soda (NaOH) is added to maintain a pH of 10.0 - 10.5 in the scrubbing solution. There is also in practice a process which uses H2O2 in series with bleach to scrub composting odors. This process relies on a series of three packed tower scrubbers: the first is a pH neutral water wash (to remove ammonia and amine odors); the second uses a conventional caustic/bleach solution in which the bleach is purposely overdosed (to oxidize the complex organic sulfur odors); and the third uses a caustic/H2O2 solution (to remove the unreacted chlorine vapors carried over from the second stage). H2O2 + HOCl → HCl + H2O + O2 Typical dose ratios are 0.5 parts H2O2 per part hypochlorite (OCl-), with sufficient caustic soda (NaOH) added to maintain a pH of 8.5 in the scrubbing solution.

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Gravity Main Sulfide Odor Control with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Gravity main sewer systems include major trunk lines and the tributaries that feed them. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) odor builds up in the collections system as the flows collect from upstream reaches and become larger, deeper and more septic (oxygen depleted) in the downstream reaches more near to the wastewater treatment plant. In general, most of the more significant hydrogen sulfide odor and corrosion control problems occur in the major trunk systems segments conveying flow to the plant. Therefore, selection of sulfide treatment for gravity systems has several options depending mainly on: Duration of control required Degree of septicity (oxygen depletion) Location of target control points or "hot spots" Location of available dosing points upstream of "hot spots" Availability of civil infrastructure and utilities Sensitivity to hazardous chemicals

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Headworks Odor and Corrosion Control Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    Hydrogen Peroxide typically controls odors and corrosion at treatment plant headworks by direct oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) within the wastewater. In the direct oxidation mode, H2O2 is applied to the wastewater 5-30 minutes prior to the point where the odors are being released, generally as the wastewater line enters the plant boundary. The efficiency of hydrogen peroxide treatment depends upon the available reaction time, the level of iron in the wastewater (reaction catalyst), wastewater pH and temperature, and the initial and target levels of H2S odor. Under optimal conditions, effective dose ratios are 1.2 - 1.5 parts H2O2 per part dissolved sulfide, and can be reliably estimated through beaker tests. H2O2 + H2S → S0 + 2H2O Frequently, control of odors through the primary clarifiers is wanted. In such case, the mechanism of control is both direct oxidation of H2S (as it rises from the solids blanket), and prevention of odor generation (by supplying dissolved oxygen). Control is typically achieved with a booster dose of 1-2 mg/L H2O2 added to the clarifier influent. Higher doses or alternate modes of addition may be required in cases where: 1) hydraulic retention times are > 2-3 hours; 2) solids blanket depths are > 1-2 feet; 3) soluble BOD levels are > 200-300 mg/L; or 4) waste activated sludge is co-settled with the primary solids. 2H2O2 → O2 + 2H2O

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Chlorine dioxide for municipal wastewater treatment industry

    Wastewater Deodorization: The formation of hydrogen sulfide often poses a problem for municipal wastewater treatment.  Chlorine dioxide, a powerful oxidant, can be effectively used to control noxious, irritating, or pungent odors from many operations.  Moreover, its unique selective properties permit more efficient application at a lower dosage and cost than chorine, hypochlorite, permanganate peroxide or ozone.

    By DuPont Chlorine Dioxide based in North Kingstown,, RHODE ISLAND (USA).

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    Applications and Air Pollutants Removed in Wastewater Treatment Operations

    Removing hydrogen sulfide, mercaptans and other organosulfur compounds from wastewater treatment plant odor causing processes and areas. Stripping of ammonia and other VOC compounds.

    By Bionomic Industries Inc. based in Mahwah, NEW JERSEY (USA).

  • Sulfide Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)

    Sulfide Odor Control Sulfide is found throughout the environment as a result of both natural and industrial processes. Most sulfide found in nature was produced biologically (under anaerobic conditions) and occurs as free hydrogen sulfide (H2S) - characterized by its rotten egg odor. We are most likely to encounter biogenic H2S in sour groundwaters, swamps and marshes, natural gas deposits, and sewage collection/treatment systems. Manmade sources of H2S typically occur as a result of natural materials containing sulfur (e.g., coal, gas and oil) being refined into industrial products. For a variety of reasons - aesthetics (odor control), health (toxicity), ecological (oxygen depletion in receiving waters), and economic (corrosion of equipment and infrastructure) - sulfide laden wastewaters must be handled carefully and remediated before they can be released to the environment. Typical discharge limits for sulfide are < 1 mg/L. Sulfide Treatment Alternatives There are dozens of alternatives for treating sulfide laden waters, ranging from simple air stripping (for the low levels present in groundwaters) to elaborate sulfur recovery plants (used to treat several tons per day at refineries and coal burning power plants). There are processes based on biology (using compost filters, scrubbing media, or inhibition/disinfection), chemistry (oxidation, precipitation, absorption, and combination), and physics (adsorption, volatilization, and incineration). Each process occupies a niche which is often defined by the scale and continuity of treatment, whether the sulfide is in solution or is a gas, the concentration of sulfide involved, and the disposition of the sulfide containing medium. However, for reasons relating to convenience and flexibility, chemical oxidation (using hydrogen peroxide) continues to grow in its scope of application. Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide While other peroxygens such as permonosulfuric (Caro’s) acid, peracetic acid, and persulfates will oxidize sulfide, their use for this application is overkill. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is considerably simpler and more cost-effective. H2O2 may control sulfides in two ways, depending on the application: Prevention - by providing dissolved oxygen which inhibits the septic conditions which lead to biological sulfide formation; and Destruction - by oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur or sulfate ion.

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Oxygen generation for ozone industry

    Ozone is a highly effective method for bacteriological treatment and useful in a variety of everyday situations from removing odor to ensuring clean, high quality drinking water from the tap. But O3 is more than just effective. It is also environmentally safe, which makes it highly suitable for treating water in enormous quantities; both drinking water and industrial waste water, i.e. in industrial slaughterhouses.

    By Oxymat A/S based in Helsinge, DENMARK.

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    Hydrogen sulfide removal in sludge management

    In the treatment of sanitary sewage, bio-solids are separated from the liquid. These bio-solids are concentrated and dewatered using filter presses, centrifuges, or other devices. Hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans are released during the dewatering operation.  Carus permanganates react quickly and produce immediate results for hydrogen sulfide removal in order to provide a safe, odor free environment and minimize corrosion due to sulfides.

    By Carus Corporation based in Peru, ILLINOIS (USA).

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