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phytoplankton monitor Applications

  • Monitoring of Algal Production / Monitoring of Algae Growth

    Over the past 20 years active fluorescence has been widely adopted by the scientific community, ecosystem managers and crop growers as a rapid and non-invasive method of estimating photosynthetic performance within a wide range of organisms, including phytoplankton (microalgae and cyanobacteria), biofilms, benthic autotrophs (corals, macroalgae and sea grasses) and terrestrial plants. The main rational for applying active fluorescence is that changes in key fluorescence parameters can reveal the early onset of chronic and acute degradation of photosynthetic performance and subsequent growth, e.g. resulting from nutrient deficiency or the presence on one or more toxicants.

    Over the past 15 years we have been developing an active fluorescence technique called Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometry to monitor algae populations in the open-ocean, primarily to support climate and ocean modelling.

    By Chelsea Technologies Group based in West Molesey, UNITED KINGDOM.

  • Monitoring of Harmful Algae Blooms

    At frst it seems impossible: how can a sensor on board of a satellite circling the earth at an altitude of some 700 kilometers not only identify the total biomass of algae in the water, but also identify species of algae. This is related to what remote sensing specialists call the refectance spectrum of the water. The spectrum is a specifc fngerprint that is created by measuring the refection of water using extremely sensitive sensors, either onboard of a satellite or inside our equipment on the ground. We use a variety of algorithms to translate refectance spectra into concentrations of specifc compounds and phytoplankton species

    By BlueLeg Monitor BV based in JG Sneek, NETHERLANDS.

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