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residual chlorine Applications

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    Chlorinated hydrocarbons

    The hazardous chlorinated hydrocarbons are completely destroyed without residue. There is no generation of hazardous by-products, e.g. dioxins.

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    CleanOxide usage in food processing

    CleanOxide Chlorine Dioxide can safely be used for washing fruit and vegetables, seafood, meat, mushrooms and many other foodstuffs. CleanOxide Chlorine Dioxide destroys bacteria including potentially harmful pathogens such as E.coli, as well as controlling fungi and fungal spores ensuring reduced risk for the consumer and increased shelf life for the produce. Residual chlorine dioxide left on the produce degrades rapidly leaving no harmful residues.

    By NW Solutions based in Perth, AUSTRALIA.

  • Cyanide Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Cyanides are used in a number of chemical synthesis and metallurgical processes (as simple salts or cyanide complexes). As a class, cyanides are highly toxic and must be destroyed or removed from wastewaters prior to discharge. The most common method for treating free or simple cyanide is alkaline chlorination. However, chlorination of cyanide results in highly toxic intermediates (e.g., cyanogen chloride) and, if organic material is present, chlorinated VOC’s. These compounds, together with the residual chlorine, create additional environmental problems. Consequently, there is a growing need for alternative, non-chlorine methods for destroying cyanides. Peroxygen compounds such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxymonosulfuric acid (1), and persulfates (1) are effective alternatives to alkaline chlorination for destroying free and complexed cyanides. The choice of peroxygen system depends on the reaction time available, the desired products (cyanate, or CO2 and NH3), the types of cyanides being treated (free, weak acid dissociable, or inert), and the system economics. Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide While hydrogen peroxide will oxidize free cyanide, it is common to catalyze the reaction with a transition metal such as soluble copper, vanadium, tungsten or silver in concentrations of 5 to 50 mg/L (2).

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

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