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sewage gas Applications

  • Mobile Sewage Treatment for the Oil and Gas Industry

    Due to the continued growth in the oil & gas industry, we are seeing an increased demand for mobile sewage treatment solutions for oil exploration and drilling rigs in remote locations.

    By Nomadic Systems based in Langley, BRITISH COLUMBIA (CANADA).

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    Portable and fixed gas analysers for sewage / waste water treatment AD

    AD of human waste has been common in many countries for years but increasing energy costs now drive efficiency. Sewage processors are large energy users and AD can offset and help manage this.

    By Geotechnical Instruments (UK) Ltd. based in Leamington Spa, UNITED KINGDOM.

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    Gas Sensing for Gasification

    Syngas (short for synthetic gas) can be burnt and used as a fuel source, the main constituents of syngas are Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrogen (H), which amount for around 85% of Syngas, and it is produced by a process called Gasification. Gasification starts with a base material which can originate from a wide variety of materials for example wood chips and pellets, plastics, municipal solid waste, sewage, waste crops, and fossil fuels such as coal. During Gasification the base material is reacted at high temperature without combustion with controlled amounts of oxygen (O) or steam. The composition of the base material combined with the amount of oxygen and heat used in the process affects the composition of the resultant SynGas, in which the CO can vary between around 20 and 60%. In addition, large amounts of H and CO are also formed. The measurement of CO is therefore an important feature in the production of SynGas.

    By Edinburgh Instruments Ltd based in Livingston, UNITED KINGDOM.

  • Force Main Systems Sulfide Odor Control with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Force main systems are typically high sulfide odor generators due to septicity conditions related to full pipe flow and a greater anaerobic slime layer (biofilm) thickness. Primary factors that influence sulfide loading generation in a force main include sewage temperature, BOD, retention time, pipe size and flow. Gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) release at the force main discharge is usually the main concern related to odor and corrosion control needs; however, corrosion problems within the pipe can be of a concern (e.g. "crown cutting") at locations where air pockets can lead to concentrated H2S gas build up. Some basic considerations for assessing an appropriate sulfide odor treatment method for force main systems include: Retention time / duration of control Pump station type / cycling (e.g. vfd; start/stop, etc). Force main injection tap points, if any (e.g. air relief valves) Existence of intermediate re-lift stations or in series pump stations Manifold force main systems

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Sulfide Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)

    Sulfide Odor Control Sulfide is found throughout the environment as a result of both natural and industrial processes. Most sulfide found in nature was produced biologically (under anaerobic conditions) and occurs as free hydrogen sulfide (H2S) - characterized by its rotten egg odor. We are most likely to encounter biogenic H2S in sour groundwaters, swamps and marshes, natural gas deposits, and sewage collection/treatment systems. Manmade sources of H2S typically occur as a result of natural materials containing sulfur (e.g., coal, gas and oil) being refined into industrial products. For a variety of reasons - aesthetics (odor control), health (toxicity), ecological (oxygen depletion in receiving waters), and economic (corrosion of equipment and infrastructure) - sulfide laden wastewaters must be handled carefully and remediated before they can be released to the environment. Typical discharge limits for sulfide are < 1 mg/L. Sulfide Treatment Alternatives There are dozens of alternatives for treating sulfide laden waters, ranging from simple air stripping (for the low levels present in groundwaters) to elaborate sulfur recovery plants (used to treat several tons per day at refineries and coal burning power plants). There are processes based on biology (using compost filters, scrubbing media, or inhibition/disinfection), chemistry (oxidation, precipitation, absorption, and combination), and physics (adsorption, volatilization, and incineration). Each process occupies a niche which is often defined by the scale and continuity of treatment, whether the sulfide is in solution or is a gas, the concentration of sulfide involved, and the disposition of the sulfide containing medium. However, for reasons relating to convenience and flexibility, chemical oxidation (using hydrogen peroxide) continues to grow in its scope of application. Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide While other peroxygens such as permonosulfuric (Caro’s) acid, peracetic acid, and persulfates will oxidize sulfide, their use for this application is overkill. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is considerably simpler and more cost-effective. H2O2 may control sulfides in two ways, depending on the application: Prevention - by providing dissolved oxygen which inhibits the septic conditions which lead to biological sulfide formation; and Destruction - by oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur or sulfate ion.

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

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