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sludge level Applications

  • Cavity pump for mining industry

    The demanding mining industry requires a lot from its progressing cavity pumps. A large range of media needs to be pumped with a variety of viscosity levels that can be highly abrasive. Media pumped include mineral slurries, thickened sludges, waste water, and drilling muds.  Moyno progressing cavity pumps meet the demands of the mining industry.

    By Moyno, Inc. based in Springfield, OHIO (USA).

  • Oxygen Generating Systems for Sewage Treatment

    Using Oxygen to Solve Waste Water Problems Lack of oxygen can cause inadequate purification or even anaerobic decomposition, as well as offensive odors. Injecting oxygen into sludge beds &/or piping allows you to: * Reduce nitrogen levels * Meet peak O2 demands * Have a back up to your aeration system * Pre-purify waste water * Control odors * Deter corrosion damage * Meet increased requirements regarding waste water purification

    By Oxygen Generating Systems Intl. (OGSI) based in North Tonawanda, NEW YORK (USA).

  • X-ray fluorescence XRF analysis for environmental protection and waste management

    To meet the requirements of new regulations and to protect the environment effectively, industries need techniques that enable the analysis of elements at lowest concentration levels. Bruker X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is the most suitable analytical technique for handling different kinds of materials. Bruker’s XRF, ICP-MS, GC, TOF-MS, FT-IR, CBRNE products and applications help you to monitor contaminated land efficiently and quickly, to determine hazardous elements in the air and water, as well as to classify waste material and to specify products for recycling and disposal. Whether solids, sludge, filters, liquids or powders: there is a fast and simple sample preparation technique for every material type.

    By Bruker Corporation based in Billerica, MASSACHUSETTS (USA).

  • Waste water respirometry solutions for toxicity based consents

    Water companies, water authorities or publicly-owned treatment works (POTW) need to have some knowledge of the composition of the wastes they it receive. In addition to testing for ammonia and BOD or COD levels, treatment works can license industrial discharges on the basis of concentrations of some of the known toxic compounds. However, it is recognised that very many non-regulated toxic materials still enter the treatment works and reduce the efficiency of biodegradation, and may cause toxic shock. The way is now open for more widespread use of direct toxicity tests as a basis for toxicity-based consents. Samples of the industrial effluent are collected at source, for testing on the actual bacteria of the receiving activated sludge. The tests used are the Respiration Inhibition Test and the Nitrification Inhibition Test. Note that this approach mirrors that of the regulators of discharges to receiving waters, who are now using direct toxicity tests (DTA) or whole effluent toxicity tests (WET tests) in order to protect the receiving environment.

    By Strathkelvin Instruments Ltd. based in Motherwell, UNITED KINGDOM.

  • Headworks Odor and Corrosion Control Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    Hydrogen Peroxide typically controls odors and corrosion at treatment plant headworks by direct oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) within the wastewater. In the direct oxidation mode, H2O2 is applied to the wastewater 5-30 minutes prior to the point where the odors are being released, generally as the wastewater line enters the plant boundary. The efficiency of hydrogen peroxide treatment depends upon the available reaction time, the level of iron in the wastewater (reaction catalyst), wastewater pH and temperature, and the initial and target levels of H2S odor. Under optimal conditions, effective dose ratios are 1.2 - 1.5 parts H2O2 per part dissolved sulfide, and can be reliably estimated through beaker tests. H2O2 + H2S → S0 + 2H2O Frequently, control of odors through the primary clarifiers is wanted. In such case, the mechanism of control is both direct oxidation of H2S (as it rises from the solids blanket), and prevention of odor generation (by supplying dissolved oxygen). Control is typically achieved with a booster dose of 1-2 mg/L H2O2 added to the clarifier influent. Higher doses or alternate modes of addition may be required in cases where: 1) hydraulic retention times are > 2-3 hours; 2) solids blanket depths are > 1-2 feet; 3) soluble BOD levels are > 200-300 mg/L; or 4) waste activated sludge is co-settled with the primary solids. 2H2O2 → O2 + 2H2O

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

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