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water filter element Applications

  • Sulfide Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)

    Sulfide Odor Control Sulfide is found throughout the environment as a result of both natural and industrial processes. Most sulfide found in nature was produced biologically (under anaerobic conditions) and occurs as free hydrogen sulfide (H2S) - characterized by its rotten egg odor. We are most likely to encounter biogenic H2S in sour groundwaters, swamps and marshes, natural gas deposits, and sewage collection/treatment systems. Manmade sources of H2S typically occur as a result of natural materials containing sulfur (e.g., coal, gas and oil) being refined into industrial products. For a variety of reasons - aesthetics (odor control), health (toxicity), ecological (oxygen depletion in receiving waters), and economic (corrosion of equipment and infrastructure) - sulfide laden wastewaters must be handled carefully and remediated before they can be released to the environment. Typical discharge limits for sulfide are < 1 mg/L. Sulfide Treatment Alternatives There are dozens of alternatives for treating sulfide laden waters, ranging from simple air stripping (for the low levels present in groundwaters) to elaborate sulfur recovery plants (used to treat several tons per day at refineries and coal burning power plants). There are processes based on biology (using compost filters, scrubbing media, or inhibition/disinfection), chemistry (oxidation, precipitation, absorption, and combination), and physics (adsorption, volatilization, and incineration). Each process occupies a niche which is often defined by the scale and continuity of treatment, whether the sulfide is in solution or is a gas, the concentration of sulfide involved, and the disposition of the sulfide containing medium. However, for reasons relating to convenience and flexibility, chemical oxidation (using hydrogen peroxide) continues to grow in its scope of application. Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide While other peroxygens such as permonosulfuric (Caro’s) acid, peracetic acid, and persulfates will oxidize sulfide, their use for this application is overkill. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is considerably simpler and more cost-effective. H2O2 may control sulfides in two ways, depending on the application: Prevention - by providing dissolved oxygen which inhibits the septic conditions which lead to biological sulfide formation; and Destruction - by oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur or sulfate ion.

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • X-ray fluorescence XRF analysis for environmental protection and waste management

    To meet the requirements of new regulations and to protect the environment effectively, industries need techniques that enable the analysis of elements at lowest concentration levels. Bruker X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is the most suitable analytical technique for handling different kinds of materials. Bruker’s XRF, ICP-MS, GC, TOF-MS, FT-IR, CBRNE products and applications help you to monitor contaminated land efficiently and quickly, to determine hazardous elements in the air and water, as well as to classify waste material and to specify products for recycling and disposal. Whether solids, sludge, filters, liquids or powders: there is a fast and simple sample preparation technique for every material type.

    By Bruker Corporation based in Billerica, MASSACHUSETTS (USA).

  • Dust monitoring and Sand Storm Monitoring

    The frequency and intensity of dust and sand storms in many parts of the world are steadily increasing due to droughts and climate change. The severity of such storms is anticipated to increase over the coming years. These dust storms may last hours or days and cause huge damage and imposed a heavy toll on society with its physical effects, such as visibility reduction, heavy winds, red sky, hailstone and severe lightning. Such Dust storms, have a negative impact on human health, and industrial products and activities. They reduce visibility, layer on skin and cloths, infiltrate buildings and find their way into food and drinking water leaving a permanent sandy feeling in your mouth. Traditional dust monitoring instruments whether they be purely filter based gravimetric samplers or continuous monitors utilising Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) or Beta Attenuation (BAM) simply are unable to cope with the high dust loads created by these storms. The filters on these instruments are quickly clogged and no further measurements are possible until a service technician visits to replace filters and filter tapes. In dust storm events this is impossible. Therefore, over the past few years a need for alternate technology which are non filter based, can cope with extremely high dust loads, require minimal maintenance and can operate off solar power has been employed in regions such as the Gobi Desert of China for the continuous monitoring of dust storm events. These instruments have demonstrated that an instrument can measure dust storm events with maintenance performed only once every 12 months. That it is possible to communicate remotely and that these systems can not only provide an early warning for dust events but have the accuracy and sensitivity to be an extremely useful tool in gauging hourly changes of visibility. Infact such instruments have been utilised by a number of EPAs around the world, including all Australian EPAs for the purpose of measuring ambient visibility as well as providing an accurate indication of rising dust events.

    By Ecotech Pty Ltd based in Knoxfield, AUSTRALIA.

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