John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

A broad cocktail of environmental pollutants found in eggs of three seabird species from remote colonies in Norway

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Three seabird species, Common eider (Somateria mollisima), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis aristotelis), and European herring gull (Larus argentatus), were selected to survey for a broad range of legacy and emerging pollutants to assess chemical mixture exposure profiles of seabirds from the Norwegian marine environment. A total of 201 chemical substances were targeted for analysis ranging from metals, organotin compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and associated metabolites, chlorinated paraffins, chlorinated and non‐chlorinated organic pesticides, per‐ and polyfluroalkyl substances (PFAS), dechlorane plus, octachlorostyrene, brominated flame retardants, organophosphorous compounds (OPCs), brominated and alkyl phenols, cyclic siloxanes, and phthalates. Of the chemicals targeted, 149 substances were found above the detection limits with metals dominating the contaminant profile and comprising 60% of the total contaminant load. PCBs, pesticides, OPCs and PFAS were the dominant contaminant classes of organic pollutants found within seabird species with the highest loads occurring in herring gulls followed by shag and common eider. New generation pollutants (e.g., PFAS, OPCs and some alkylphenols) were detected at similar or higher concentrations than the legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Time trends of reported concentrations of legacy POPs appear to have decreased in the last decades from the Norwegian coastal environment. Concentrations of detected pollutants do not appear to have a negative effect on seabird population development within the sampling area. However, additional stress caused by pollutants may affect seabird health more at the individual level. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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