A comparison of disinfection performance and cost for various process combinations to disinfect reclaimed water

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For reclaimed water disinfection, pathogen reduction to acceptable public health risk levels is the primary objective. A second emerging objective is the ability to destroy trace pollutants (endocrine disrupters (EDCs), pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs)) at a reasonably low cost.

The WateReuse Foundation’s Innovative Reclaimed Water Treatment Project (WRF 02-009) is searching for cost-effective treatment technologies that provide substantial barriers to pathogens and trace pollutants. Findings to date shown substantial removal of bacteria, protozoa, and trace pollutants by microfiltration (MF) with reduced performance from sand filters. Ozone (O3) and ultraviolet light (UV) combined with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pilot scale systems have shown promise for the destruction of pathogens and pollutants at economically feasible dose values.

The WateReuse Research Foundation, in conjunction with the Southwest Florida Water Management District and the United States Bureau of Reclamation, has funded Duke University, the United States Department of Agriculture, and Carollo Engineers to conduct WRF 02-009, Innovative Treatment Technologies for Reclaimed Water. The unwritten goal of the project was to find and demonstrate reclaimed water treatment technologies that can robustly destroy pathogens and microconstituents at a cost substantially below that of reverse osmosis (RO). The project includes detailed bench top, pilot, and full-scale investigations of conventional and emerging (yet market ready) technologies.

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