Adsorption experiment of toxic micro-pollutants derived from automobiles using red soil

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Courtesy of IWA Publishing

In some countries, non-point source pollution derived from a city's economic activities tends to be a barrier to the improvement of water quality. Roadway runoff is known to contain toxic micro-pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Conversely, red soil is known to adsorb some organic matter. In this study, artificial roadway runoff water containing toxic micro-pollutants was made using roadway dust collected from a highway, and used for both batch-type tests and soil column tests with red soil in order to understand adsorption ability of the red soil on such toxic micro-pollutants, especially PAHs. In the batch-type tests, PAHs could be removed by approximately 40% when the contact time was 90 minutes. In the soil column tests, PAHs were removed by more than 80% while suspended solids were removed by more than 90%. Notably, PAHs with a high molecular weight were removed more readily in the tests than PAHs with a low molecular weight.

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