John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Alteration in Pimephales promelas mucus production after exposure to nanosilver or silver nitrate

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The fish gill's ability to produce mucus effectively is a critical part of the stress response and protection against xenobiotic toxicity. Adult fathead minnows were exposed to silver nitrate (0.82 µg/L or 13.2 µg/L), polyvinylpyrrolidone‐coated silver nanoparticles (11.1 µg/L or 208 µg/L), and citrate‐coated silver nanoparticles (10.1 µg/L or 175 µg/L) for 96 h. Mucus concentrations based on glucose as a surrogate were determined at 0 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h and 24 h after re‐dosing each day. Higher mucus production rates following silver treatment were observed at the beginning as compared to controls and compared to after 3 d of exposure. Control fish produced consistent mucus concentrations throughout the exposure (0.62 mg/L and 0.40 mg/L at 24 h and 96 h, respectively). Following 24 h of exposure, all silver treatment groups produced significantly more mucus than controls. Following 96 h of exposure, mucus concentrations in treatment groups were significantly reduced compared with each respective treatment at 24 h. Reduced mucus production following long‐term silver exposure could prevent the gills from removing silver, and thus increase toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;9999:1–4. © 2014 SETAC

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