John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Cadmium‐induced changes in trace element bioaccumulation and proteomics perspective in four marine bivalves

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Bivalves are employed widely as biomonitors of metal pollution and proteomics has increasingly been applied to solve ecotoxicological issues. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Cd exposure on the bioaccumulation of other trace elements and reveal the molecular mechanisms using proteomics technologies. The results showed that Cd exposure resulted in remarkable changes in body concentrations of Zn, Cu, Ag, Co, Ni, Pb, and Se in four marine bivalves (scallop Chlamys nobilis, clam Ruditapes philippinarum, mussel Perna viridis, and oyster Saccostrea cucullata). Generally, the bivalves exposed to higher Cd concentration accumulated higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Se, but a lower concentration of Co. The accumulation of Ag, Ni, and Pb was specific for different species. The data strongly suggest that the influences of one metal exposure on the bioaccumulation of other metals/metalloids need to be considered in interpreting body concentrations of the elements in the biomonitors. Cd exposure had little effect on bivalve proteomes, and the identified proteins were insufficient to explain the observed disruption of trace element metabolism. However, protein expression signatures composed of the altered proteins could distinguish the clams and the mussels with different body Cd levels. The strong up‐regulation of galectin in Cd‐exposed oysters indicated the protein as a novel biomarker in environmental monitoring. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. © 2012 SETAC

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