CCS vs. Electrostatic Precipitators for Abrasives, Ceramics, Non-Soluble PM2.5, Submicron Particulate

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Courtesy of Tri-Mer Corporation

Manufacturing Processes. Applications where conventional equipment is very inefficient or very expensive to operate and maintain provides an opportunity for the Cloud Chamber Scrubber (CCS) to showcase its unique capabilities. Abrasives manufacturing is a typical example.

CCS Cloud Chamber technology was chosen by Saint-Gobain Advanced Ceramics Corp. (formerly Carborundum Corp.) for the collection of boric acid emissions from induction furnaces.  Saint-Gobain is a world leader in the manufacture and distribution of boron nitride products. Furnaces operate at 2000°C.

An analysis of the particle distribution of the emissions indicates about one-third of the particles are smaller than 0.4 micron, with two-thirds less than 1 micron. Over 80% is PM2.5. In this difficult application, a five-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (Wet ESP) was piloted first, with unsatisfactory results.

The subsequent success of the CCS, with over 99% efficiency, highlights its ability to treat a broader range of particulate composition specifically PM2.5, at a fraction of the operating cost. The CCS system has been in place since spring of 2000 and operating 24/7.

Plant management also reports high satisfaction with the extremely low maintenance required, consisting primarily of routine preventative maintenance such as tightening belts or lubricating bearings on pumps and fans during the annual plant shutdown.

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