Differences in soluble COD and ammonium when applying inverted phase fermentation to primary, secondary and mixed sludge

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Courtesy of IWA Publishing

Primary, secondary and mixed sludge were treated by inverted phase fermentation. This treatment results in solid–liquid separation of sludge after endogenous enzymatic hydrolysis (anaerobic conditions: 42°C, 48 hours). The soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) was increased in the solid phase up to 1,800%, 21,300% and 260% in primary, secondary and mixed sludge, respectively. The corresponding increase in sCOD in the liquid phase accordingly reached values of up to 440%, 5,100% and 140%. Phase separation led to an enrichment of volatile solids in the solid phase (89–358% primary sludge, 80–102% secondary sludge and 29–133% mixed sludge). The NH4+-N values increased notably after the endogenous enzymatic hydrolysis itself. To investigate the short-term evolution following the treatment, the variation in sCOD, NH4+-N and solids was also monitored after keeping the hydrolysate at 37°C under anaerobic conditions for 24 hours. This stage showed no generalized pattern in terms of sCOD.

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