John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Do water quality criteria based on non‐native species provide appropriate protection for native species

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The potential use of toxicity data for non‐native species to derive water quality criteria (WQC) is controversial, due to the fact that it is sometimes questioned whether criteria based on species from one geographical region provide appropriate protection for species in a different region. However, this is an important concept for the development of Chinese water quality criteria or standards. Data was assembled for 38 chemicals for which values were available for both native and non‐native species. Sensitivities of these organisms were compared based on the HC5 values and the species sensitivity distribution from a literature review. Results of this analysis showed there is approximately 74% certainty that use of non‐native species to generate WQC would be sufficiently protective of aquatic ecosystems in China. Without applying any assessment factor to the WQC generated from non‐native species, the uncertainty would be 26% when the native Chinese species were under protection. Applying an assessment factor of 10, would offer adequate protection to native Chinese species for about 90% of tested chemicals, and thus reduce the uncertainly from 26% to 10%. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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