John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ecotoxicological evaluation of low‐concentration bisphenol A exposure on the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and intrinsic mechanisms of stress response in vivo

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As a representative species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive animal model for evaluating ecotoxicological effects and intrinsic mechanisms of stress response in vivo. To acquire a better knowledge of environmental effects of bisphenol A (BPA), ecotoxicological evaluations were conducted using C. elegans upon the physiological (growth, locomotion behaviors, and reproduction), biochemical (lipofuscin accumulation, reactive oxygen species production, and cell apoptosis), and molecular (stress‐related genes expressions) responses. Nematodes were exposed to BPA (0.001 to 10 µM) in two assay systems (L4 larvae for 24 h and L1 larvae for 72 h). BPA exposure could significantly (p < 0.05) alter body length, locomotion behaviors, brood size, cell apoptosis, and selected stress‐related genes expressions. At the physiological level, BPA exerted adverse effects on nematodes at the µg/L level in both assay systems, with head thrashes as the most sensitive endpoint. At the biochemical level, apoptosis degree showed increases at concentrations above 0.1 µM in both assay systems. At the molecular level, BPA induced increases in selected stress‐related genes expressions, even at the lowest tested concentration. In addition, BPA induced cell apoptosis was suggested as a potential mode of action, resulting in the adverse physiological effects. Therefore, BPA exposure was speculated to impose developmental, reproductive, and neurobehavioral toxicities on C. elegans, and caused variations of stress‐related genes expressions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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