John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Environmental assessment of depleted uranium used in military armor‐piercing rounds in terrestrial systems

0
Depleted uranium (DU) from the military testing and use of armor‐piercing kinetic energy penetrators has been shown to accumulate in soils; however, little is known about the toxicity of DU geochemical species created through corrosion/weathering. The purpose of the current study was to assess the toxic effects and bioaccumulation potential of field‐collected DU oxides to the model terrestrial invertebrates, Eisenia fetida (earthworm) and Porcellio scaber (isopod). Earthworm studies were acute (72 h) dermal exposures or 28‐d spiked soil exposures that utilized non‐contaminated field‐collected soils from the US Army's Yuma and Aberdeen Proving Grounds (YPG and APG). Endpoints assessed in earthworm testing included bioaccumulation, growth, reproduction, behavior (soil avoidance), and cellular stress (neutral red uptake in coelomocytes). Isopod testing utilized spiked food and endpoints assessed included bioaccumulation, survival, and feeding behavior. Concentration‐dependent bioaccumulation of DU in earthworms was observed with a maximum bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of 0.35; however, no significant reductions in survival or impacts to cellular stress were observed. Reproduction lowest observed effect concentrations of 158 and 96 mg/kg were observed in YPG and a Mississippi reference soil (Karnac Ferry), respectively. Earthworm avoidance of contaminated soils was not observed in 48‐h soil avoidance studies; however, isopods were shown to avoid food spiked with 12.7% by weight DU oxides through digital tracking studies. Environ Toxicol Chem © 2014 SETAC

Customer comments

No comments were found for Environmental assessment of depleted uranium used in military armor‐piercing rounds in terrestrial systems. Be the first to comment!