Food Safety Educational Intervention Positively Influences College Students’ Food Safety Attitudes, Beliefs, Knowledge, and Self-Reported Practices

0
In this study, the authors evaluated college students’ food safety attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and self-reported practices and explored whether these variables were positively influenced by educational intervention. Students (n = 59), were mostly seniors, health or non-health majors, and responsible for meal preparation. Subjects completed a food safety questionnaire (FSQ) prior to educational intervention, which consisted of three interactive modules. Subjects completed module pre-, post-, and post-posttests. The FSQ was also administered after exposure to intervention and five weeks later to determine changes in food safety attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and self-reported practices. Students’ FSQ attitude scores increased from 114 to 122 (p ≤ .001); FSQ belief and knowledge scores improved from 86 to 98 (p ≤ .001) and from 11 to 13 (p ≤ .001), respectively. Food safety knowledge was also measured by module pre- and posttests, and improved significantly after intervention for all students, with health majors having the greatest increase. Intervention resulted in improved food safety self-reported practices for health majors only. The educational intervention appeared effective in improving food safety beliefs and knowledge. For health majors, attitudes and some self-reported practices improved. For all areas, the strongest effects were seen in health majors.

Customer comments

No comments were found for Food Safety Educational Intervention Positively Influences College Students’ Food Safety Attitudes, Beliefs, Knowledge, and Self-Reported Practices. Be the first to comment!