Inderscience Publishers

Food security in Ethiopia: climate–resilient pathways, quantified benefits and farmer perspectives

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Courtesy of Inderscience Publishers

This paper summarises a study of a project in Ethiopia, then discusses its findings. The project aimed to address acute hunger facing small–scale farmers while also fostering longer–term food security. It was found to be highly successful, as reflected in a benefit–cost ratio of 9:1. Yet the target communities continue to struggle nonetheless due largely to emerging threats, notably worsening climate change impacts. Fortunately, this intervention also left promising opportunities unexplored, creating hope that closing these gaps could enable these communities - and others like them - to achieve food security and resilience to climatic shocks. One approach used to highlight future opportunities is to compare farmers' observations. Interventions in food insecure farming communities are needed and can deliver benefits that amply justify their costs, yet they must learn from experience to maximise their chances of success. The methodology employed provides a useful template for future studies to guide future interventions.

Keywords: food security, climate–resilient pathways, small–scale farmers, voice, community–based cost–benefit analysis, environmental valuation, scaling up, Africa, Ethiopia, farmer perspectives, climate change impact, food insecurity, farming communities, hunger

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