John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Fungi from metal‐polluted streams may have high ability to cope with the oxidative stress induced by copper oxide nanoparticles

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Increased commercialization of products based on metal oxide nanoparticles increases the chance of their release into aquatic environments making it relevant to assess their potential impacts on aquatic biota. Aquatic fungi are worldwide distributed and play a key role in organic matter turnover in freshwater ecosystems. We investigated the impacts of copper oxide spherical nanoparticles (< 50 nm powder of nanoCuO, 5 levels ≤ 200 mg/L) on cellular targets and antioxidant defenses in five fungal isolates collected from metal‐polluted or non‐polluted streams. NanoCuO induced oxidative stress in aquatic fungi, as shown by intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and led to plasma membrane damage and DNA‐strand breaks in a concentration‐dependent manner. Effects were more pronounced at longer exposure time (3 vs 10 days). Under nanoCuO exposure, mycelia of fungi collected from metal‐polluted streams showed less oxidative stress and higher activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase comparing to fungi from non‐polluted streams. The latter fungi responded to nanoCuO with a stronger stimulation of glutathione peroxidase activity. These findings may indicate that fungi isolated from metal‐polluted streams had a greater ability to maintain the pool of reduced glutathione than those from non‐polluted streams. Overall results suggest that populations adapted to metals may develop mechanisms to cope with the oxidative stress induced by metal nanoparticles. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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