aquatic biodiversity Articles

  • Linking Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems: Complexity, Persistence and Biodiversity in European Food Webs

    The last years have witnessed the emergence of research in the field of complex networks. Complex networks describe a considerable amount of natural and social systems with a large, irregular, and changing in time structure, build up of thousands of nodes and ties between them. Certainly the continuous increase of computational power has supported the analysis of the wide databases of real ...


  • Attitudes of Europeans towards the issue of biodiversity

    The European Union (EU) is committed to the protection of 'biological diversity', i.e. the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine, and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems1. The EU has been legislating on biodiversity since the ...

  • Biodiversity Detectives Solve Mysteries with Environmental DNA

    For years, Monterey Bay Aquarium’s 1.2 million gallon main tank has been a source of thrill for visitors seeking fish-eye views of life in the pounding Pacific Ocean right outside its doors. Now, thanks to advances in DNA sequencing, it’s also becoming a model for how to survey life inthat vast ocean with just a few glasses of water. In a study published last January in ...


    By Ensia

  • Rapid decline in biodiversity: a threat to survival of humankind

    Biodiversity, coined from two words; Biological Diversity simply refers to the variety and variability of life forms (plants, animals and micro-organisms) on earth. In other words, it is the totality of genes, species, and ecosystems in a region. Thus, biodiversity can be divided into genetic diversity within specie, Specie diversity within a community in an ecosystem as well as the more complex ...


  • Communication of the European Commission to the Council and to the Parliament on a European Community Biodiversity Strategy

    INTRODUCTION 1. Biological diversity (biodiversity) is essential to maintain life on earth and has important social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic values. In addition to its intrinsic value biodiversity determines our resilience to changing circumstances. Without adequate biodiversity, events such as climate change and pest infestations are more likely ...

  • Hampton Court - BritishFlora design sustainable planting solution for

    Royal Palace Waterways BritishFlora designed a sustainable solution for enhanced aquatic planting in the hard engineered waterways at Hampton Court. This is part of a wider pond and waterway restoration scheme across the Park to improve biodiversity, water quality, erosion prevention and aesthetics of these formal and natural water ways across Hampton Court. ...


    By BritishFlora

  • Water quality monitoring in wetland ecosystems using microbial model communities

    This study reviews the concept of model communities for water quality assessment in aquatic ecosystems. The feeding habits of protozoans were used to unite species into functional, trophic groups. Colonising communities were dominated by bacterivorous Flagellate Species (Sf). A new Index of Periphyton Flagellates (IPF) as an indicator of the trophic status of a water-body was developed. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Beta diversity as a tool for determining priority streams for management actions

    Beta diversity has become essential for understanding ecosystem functioning and for determining biodiversity-conservation priority areas. However, the beta diversity patterns of invertebrates in tropical aquatic ecosystems are not well known, particularly in streams. Using data from low-order streams located in southern Brazil, we evaluated the beta diversity of Chironomidae. We tested the ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • In search of effective bioassessment of urban stormwater pond sediments: enhancing the ‘sediment quality triad’ approach with oligochaete metrics

    Stormwater ponds have been widely used to control increased volumes and rates of surface runoff resulting from urbanization. As receiving waters, they are under the influence of intermittent pollution from urban wet-weather discharges. Meanwhile they offer new aquatic habitats balancing the transformation of initial ecosystems and their associated biodiversity. Bioassessment of stormwater ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • A brief review on pollution and ecotoxicologic effects on Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem in Bangladesh

    The natural ecosystem of the Sundarbans mangrove wetlands is under threat due to anthropogenic activities. This ecosystem has become vulnerable to pollution such as oil spillage, heavy metals, and agrochemicals – which may have changed the mangrove ecosystem's biogeochemistry. In this paper, the present status of Sundarbans' mangrove pollution is reviewed. The ecotoxicologic effect on its aquatic ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Case study - Singapore gardens an Environmental sustainability showcase

    Opened in spring 2012, Gardens by the Bay features an aquatic ecosystem with sustainable water cycles Singapore government officials’ vision to become a “city in a garden” came to fruition by redeveloping Marina Bay and boldly allocating prime land and a hefty budget for that purpose. Years of construction later, the Gardens by the Bay officially opened in the spring of ...

  • Global Monthly Water Scarcity: Blue Water Footprints versus Blue Water Availability

    Freshwater scarcity is a growing concern, placing considerable importance on the accuracy of indicators used to characterize and map water scarcity worldwide. We improve upon past efforts by using estimates of blue water footprints (consumptive use of ground- and surface water flows) rather than water withdrawals, accounting for the flows needed to sustain critical ecological functions and by ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Macroinvertebrate community structure across a wetland hydroperiod gradient in southern New Hampshire, USA

    Abstract  We conducted a field study to examine the influence of hydroperiod and concomitant changes in abiotic (wetland size, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and water temperature) and biotic (predatory fish presence) characteristics on macroinvertebrate communities in isolated wetlands in southern New Hampshire. Invertebrates were sampled using dipnet sweeps in 42 wetlands with short ...


  • Wetlands International Annual Review 2010

    Our annual review provides a great and global overview of all our achievements, our projects, our publications and other products, our donors and our financial situation. Conserving wetland biodiversity 2010 was the International Year of Biodiversity, which culminated in the Nagoya conference on the Convention for Biological Diversity (CBD). Thanks to the work of our team, the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Re-oligotrophication as a challenge for tropical reservoir management with reference to Itaparica Reservoir, São Francisco, Brazil

    The process of reservoir eutrophication has been recognised as a central problem in tropical reservoir environmental quality. Effects of eutrophication are complex interactions involving a decrease in water quality, especially loss of aquatic biodiversity, occurrence of undesired species such as cyanobacteria with its cyanotoxins, mass development of macrophytes such as Egeria densa with its ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Mangrove Guidebook for Malaysia

    This guidebook is designed as an easy and practical field guide for those involved in the field management of mangroves, for students and those who are interested to learn more about mangrove plants. This guidebook uses simple descriptions and a lot of photos to help distinguish species more easily. Photos were taken from many locations in Malaysia over the last 10 years and through contribution ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Development of a Bioaccumulation Model For Herbicides in Ulva and Clams

    Coastal lagoons are shallow water ecosystems characterised by high biodiversity and primary and secondary production, and with an elevated number of different habitats. These habitats have a key role as nursery and rest areas for a great number of marine species and birds. During the last decades these ecosystems have been exposed tomany anthropogenic pressures (urban, domestic, agricultural ...


  • Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment

    Water is critical for life and is integral to virtually all economic activities, including food and industrial production. Not only is clean water a prerequisite for human health and well-being, it provides for aquatic habitats that support healthy freshwater ecosystems. A range of pollutants including nutrients, biocides, pathogenic micro-organisms, industrial and household chemicals, metals and ...

  • Remote monitors track river restoration success

    The Norfolk Rivers Trust has installed a remote river monitoring station that has been tracking water quality and flow before and after river restoration work at an area of ecological importance on the River Nar. Rising in chalk hills to the east of the village of Tittleshall, the river flows south for 2.5 km until it reaches Mileham, then predominately west for 39.5 km through the villages of ...


  • Caravan sales park uses ACO SUDS system to create unique customer environment

    The new eleven acre landscaped extension to Salop Leisure's sales centre in Shrewsbury has exploited the versatility of ACO Water Management's grated drainage channel system, ACO MultiDrain MD, to create a unique SUDS scheme that adds a striking visual aspect to the setting and prevents any risk of flooding. By using a series of swales, pools and wetlands to receive rainwater collected by ...


    By ACO Group

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