bilge water monitoring Articles

  • Monitoring Hydrocarbons in Bilge Water

    The Situation Various processes onboard ships, such as machinery wash-down, maintenance, and leakage generate oily wastewater. This contaminated water flow collects in the bilge of the ship. Marine diesel, lubricating oils, grease, as well as garbage may be present in bilge water. The bilge water is discharged overboard, with oil and grease concentrations in the discharged water limited ...

  • A Guide to Oil in Water Monitoring for Environmental Compliance

    Applications for industrial oil in water monitoring can vary greatly. In upstream and midstream oil and gas production applications, monitoring separation efficiencies is key to optimize production rates, preventative maintenance, chemical use, flow, and environmental compliance. Separated water from the oil is called produced water and it must be cleaned of oil before disposal or ...


    By Arjay Engineering Ltd.

  • EPA report on waste from cruise ships

    Cruise ships operate in every ocean worldwide, often in pristine coastal waters and sensitive marine ecosystems. Cruise ship operators provide amenities to their passengers that are similar to those of luxury resort hotels, including pools, hair salons, restaurants, and dry cleaners. As a result, cruise ships have the potential to generate wastes similar in volume and character to those generated ...

  • Cruise ship discharge assessment report

    Cruise ships operate in every ocean worldwide, often in pristine coastal waters and sensitive marine ecosystems. Cruise ship operators provide amenities to their passengers that are similar to those of luxury resort hotels, including pools, hair salons, restaurants, and dry cleaners. As a result, cruise ships have the potential to generate wastes similar in volume and character to those generated ...

  • Kay Armstrong Corners the Market in Hazardous Waste Cleanups and Community Relations

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) created the Hazardous Substance Superfund. It was intended to be a short-term program that would spend $1.6 billion over five years to clean up 400 hazardous sites around the country. Instead, more than $17 billion has been spent and only 212 sites (15% of the 1,439 listed since its inception) have been ...


    By ARMSTRONG and Associates

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