biodiversity conservation Articles

  • Impact of globalisation on biodiversity conservation

    Biodiversity is generally described at three levels – diversity of ecosystems, diversity of species, and diversity of genes. Biodiversity is both a scientific and a political concept, embracing a trinity of globally-agreed objectives such as conservation of biodiversity, sustainable use of biological resources, and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from this use. This paper describes ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Agro-Biodiversity Conservation in Europe: Ethical Issues

    While it is commonly acknowledged that the ecosystemic, and the inter- and intra-specific diversity of natural life is under threat of being irremediably lost, there is much less awareness that the diversity in agro-ecosystems is also under threat. This paper is focused on the biodiverse agro-ecosystems generated by landraces (LRs), i.e., farmer-developed populations of cultivated species that ...


    By Springer

  • Biodiversity

    Introduction This biodiversity assessment is integrating our knowledge on species, habitats and protected areas into the complex issues of ecosystem management, ecosystem services, human health and wellbeing. Chapter 2 includes an overview of the state of biodiversity in the EU and EEA member countries and an analysis on pressures with a more specific focus on terrestrial ecosystems. Biodiversity ...

  • Biodiversity and its conservation in the Sundarban Mangrove Ecosystem

    Abstract.  The Sundarban, covering about one million ha in the delta of the rivers Ganga, Brahmaputra and Meghna is shared between Bangladesh (~60%) and India (~40%), and is the world’s largest coastal wetland. The area experiences a subtropical monsoonal climate with an annual rainfall of 1,600–1,800 mm and severe cyclonic storms. Enormous amounts of sediments carried by the rivers ...


    By Springer

  • Governing biodiversity

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the value conferred on nature designates both the "objects of nature" that are the subject of consideration, and the human beings for whom they are intended or who are responsible for them. These designation processes are dynamic and linked, but also interdependent. In order to examine these processes more closely, we make use of the concept of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Mudbank - Responsible business supporting biodiversity and flyway conservation

    Mudbank is an innovative approach for business to support the conservation of wetlands and migratory waterbirds around the globe. To offset the impact of development projects, Mudbank invests on behalf of companies in the permanent protection of important coastal habitat along migratory flyways. It is designed to be an option in the Mitigation Hierarchy—and not just an “in lieu ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Property rights in non-captive wildlife and biodiversity conservation

    To reduce the rate of human-induced biodiversity loss of wild species, it has become increasingly important to stem this loss on private lands. Some writers believe that granting landholders commercial property rights in wildlife will be effective in dealing with this matter and will result in the preservation of biodiversity. This paper explores this view using economic theory. In doing so, it ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Conservation Planning and Biodiversity: Assembling the Best Data for the Job

    Readers of the note by Brooks et al. (2004) will, I hope, be persuaded of the urgent need for more comprehensive data on species. It would be unfortunate, though, if readers formed the impression that biodiversity processes cannot be seriously considered by conservation planners because 'Techniques for mapping and measuring ecological and evolutionary processes are in their infancy.' More ...


  • The institutionalisation of property rights in Albanian and Romanian biodiversity conservation

    This article examines the institutionalisation of property rights by way of two case studies on biodiversity conservation in Albania and Romania. The analysis pays particular attention to local level negotiations which occur when local actors make use of concrete resources and engage in discussions about their appropriate use. In both Albania and Romania, national parks are the object of intense ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Biodiversity and its conservation in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Abstract.  The Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil, is famous for its luxurious plant and animal life. We combine a literature review with recent work and show that species diversity is large but that most major plant and animal groups contain a large number of not wetland-specific species that depend on permanently terrestrial habitats within the Pantanal, or are restricted to dry areas during ...


    By Springer

  • Partnership for biodiversity and sustainable development

    Partnership with the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), a global program that since 2000 has provided grants to Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and private sector organizations to help protect the world's biodiversity hotspots, enhanced synergies between the Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development (BCSD) project's aims and CEPF projects in the area through ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Local approaches to biodiversity conservation: lessons from Oaxaca, southern Mexico

    Large areas of Oaxaca, southern Mexico, exhibit high biodiversity in the absence of official protected areas. This paper discusses some of the key mechanisms and practices employed by local communities to help conserve their forest resources. The findings suggest that learning from local resource management systems should become an important component of future conservation planning in Mexico. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Ecological modernisation and nature conservation

    Although ecological modernisation has a prominent position in contemporary environmental sociology, efforts to use ecological modernisation concepts in the specific case of nature conservation are remarkably absent. This article explores the potentials of applying ecological modernisation as a discourse and as a theory to issues of nature management. It is argued that ecological modernisation ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • The economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Water and Wetlands

    1. Introduction The “nexus” among water, food and energy has been recognised as one of the most fundamental relationships and challenges for society. Biodiversity and particularly wetland ecosystems are increasingly understood to be at the core of this nexus. Indeed water and wetlands are the foundation for the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of humanity across ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Water and Wetlands

    The Ramsar Secretariat, in partnership with the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP),  International Union for the Conservation of  Nature (IUCN) ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Assessing biodiversity in Europe — the 2010 report

    Executive summary This report confirms the finding of the EEA's 2009 report 'Progress towards the European 2010 biodiversity target' (EEA, 2009a) that Europe will not achieve its target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. The present report considers the status and trends of pan-European biodiversity, and the implications of these trends for biodiversity management policy and ...

  • The Curious Divide between Conservation Science and IA

    Since returning to academia, I have been struck by a particular disjuncture between the biodiversity sciences and IA practice in my country, Namibia. Having worked across Africa, my suspicion is that it probably applies to the entire continent, perhaps even broader. Allow me to expand. I had my wildlife scientist hat on a few weeks ago at a southern African symposium on wildlife tracking and ...

  • Progress Towards Halting the Loss of Biodiversity by 2010

    The continuing loss of biological diversity and its components, genes, species and ecosystems, is an issue of global concern. Research has shown that both the diversity and the identity of the various species have a fundamental influence on the magnitude and stability of the ecological processes that occur at the ecosystem level. There are significant interrelationships between the degradation of ...

  • An integrated approach to land use management for conserving agroecosystem biodiversity in the context of global change

    Agriculture is a major land use activity in the developing tropics. Though the productivity of the land in many parts of the region has gone up significantly due to "green revolution" agriculture, it has had many negative environmental consequences, and its economic impact is still confined to only a small section of society. These concerns and issues linked to agroecosystem resilience ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Sustainable use of biodiversity by the pharmaceutical industry?

    This paper discusses a key aspect of a sustainable pharmaceutical use of biodiversity: the increased demand of the pharmaceutical industry for biogenetic resources does not result in an increase of the market value of biodiversity. The increasing interest in biogenetic resources by the pharmaceutical industry since the late 1980s has led, among other things, to contracts between large ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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