bioremediation feasibility Articles

  • Enhanced Bioremediation

    Introduction Enhanced bioremediation is a process in which indigenous or inoculated micro-organisms (e.g., fungi, bacteria, and other microbes) degrade (metabolize) organic contaminants found in soil and/or ground water, converting them to innocuous end products. Nutrients, oxygen, or other amendments may be used to enhance bioremediation and contaminant desorption from subsurface materials. ...

  • A Feasibility Study for Assessment of In-situ Bioremediation Potential of a Crude Oil Degrading Pseudomonas Consortium

    Following is a link and abstract for an article published in the Journal for Scientific Research wherein a Pseudomonas consortium isolated from a site contaminated with crude oil was applied and effectively used to remediate the same contaminated site under particular environmental conditions.    Link to pdf:  ...


    By CL Solutions, LLC

  • Tyco earth tech - soil bioremediation

    Summary: In June 2006 EarthTech (a member of the Tyco group of companies) undertook the bioremedial clean-up treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated muddy gravel at one of their sites in Hungary. The muddy gravel was contaminated with TPH levels in excess of 300,000 mg/kg in parts and was a stern test for the feasibility of bioremediation within the region. The project was ...


  • The In Situ Bioremediation/Groundwater Remediation Process

    In-situ groundwater bioremediation is a technology that encourages growth and reproduction of indigenous microorganisms to enhance biodegradation of organic constituents in the saturated zone. In-situ groundwater bioremediation can effectively degrade organic constituents which are dissolved in groundwater and adsorbed onto the aquifer matrix. The Adventus In Situ Bioremediation/Groundwater ...


  • SITE Technology Capsule - DARAMEND Bioremediation Technology

    GRACE Bioremediation Technologies’ DARAMENDTM Bioremediation Technology is an amendment-enhancedbioremediation technology for soils and sediments contaminated with a wide variety of organic contaminants includingchlorinated phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum hydrocarbons. The technology may be applied ex situ to sediment and soil and in situ to near-surface soils. The ...


  • Accelerated Bioremediation as an Alternative to Conventional Remedial Technologies.

    ABSTRACT: Application of bioremediation as an alternative technology to expedite soil and ground-water remediation has been effective in reducing the concentration of hydrocarbons at an affordable cost. Bioremediation processes can be achieved by the addition of biological organisms into the soil and ground water which are contaminated and are microorganism deficient. The microorganism's ...


    By REGENESIS

  • The Use of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) for CAH Bioremediation.

    Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC™) is a simple, passive, low-cost and long-term option for the anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via a reductive dehalogenation pathway. Applications to other classes of chlorinated compounds that are anaerobically degradable by this mechanism are under investigation. HRC should be viewed as a tool for the enhancement of natural ...


    By REGENESIS

  • Engineered approaches to in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents: Fundamentals and field applications

    Halogenated volatile organic compounds, including chlorinated solvents, are the most frequently- occurring type of soil and groundwater contaminant at Superfund and other hazardous waste sites in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that, over the next several decades, site owners will spend billions of dollars to clean up these sites. New technologies that ...


    By RNAS Remediation Products

  • Bioremediation of Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) and Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPH) - Milford

    Objectives of the Case Study Place bioremediation in the overall context of combined remedial actions to achieve site objectives ...

  • Aerobic and Anaerobic Bioremediation of 1,1-DCE and Vinyl Chloride in Groundwater

    Untitled Document A three-tiered remediation approach is being used for successful field treatment of a 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) groundwater plume. The plume is characterized by ...


    By REGENESIS

  • Operating conditions for the continuous bioremediation of free cyanide contaminated wastewater using Aspergillus awamori

    Generation of cyanide-containing wastewater is a growing problem worldwide as numerous cyanide complexes are highly unstable and degrade to form free cyanide (F-CN), the most toxic form of cyanide. Agro-waste materials, such as sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) waste from the citrus industry, are rich in readily metabolisable carbohydrates that can supplement microbial activity and thus support ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • DNAPL in Clay Formation

    PROJECT BACKGROUND At a manufacturing site located in Cookeville, TN, on and offsite soil (tight clays) and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, were discovered as the result of a Phase I and a Phase II investigation. The client entered the State of Tennessee Voluntary Clean-up Oversight and Assistance Program (VCOAP), which resulted in an informal focused feasibility study to ...


    By REGENESIS

  • HRC® Reduces Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Contamination in a Complicated Geological Setting

    CASE SUMMARY Textile Facility, Northern France A subsurface plume of mixed chlorinated solvents developed as the result of historical operations at a textiles facility in Northern France. The plume was approximately 1,000 square meters in size. The complicated geology consisted of a gravelly silt (highly contaminated) overlying a silty sand (medium contamination) ...


    By REGENESIS

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Halogenated SVOCs in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for halogenated SVOCs in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, dehalogenation, incineration, and excavation with off-site disposal. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be considered to remediate soils: in situ bioremediation, bioventing, composting, controlled solid phase, or landfarming. Slurry phase biological treatment is also ...

  • TCE at Department of Defense Landfill Site

    PROJECT BACKGROUND Subsurface investigations at this 40-acre Northern California Department of Defense (DOD) landfill site revealed elevated levels of TCE in site soils and groundwater. This discovery was made through routine site monitoring, as regulated by the state of California solid waste landfill regulations. Regulators required site cleanup to reduce chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations ...


    By REGENESIS

  • A chemo-biological treatment of scrubbing water from power plants with recovery of value-added products

    A chemo-biological approach for treating sulphate-rich effluent generated during wet scrubbing of flue gas emissions from fossil fuel fired power plants has been discussed. Microbial sulphate reduction was carried out in an anaerobic up-flow packed bed bioreactor (R1) using ethanol as carbon source. More than 90% of Total Equivalent Sulphate (TES) present in the effluent was reduced to sulphide ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Nonhalogenated SVOCs in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for nonhalogenated SVOCs in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, incineration, and excavation with off-site disposal. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be considered to remediate soils: in situ bioremediation, bioventing, composting, controlled solid phase, or landfarming. Slurry phase biological treatment is also applicable but ...

  • Ex Situ Biological Treatment for Groundwater, Surface Water, and Leachate

    The main advantage of ex situ treatment is that it generally requires shorter time periods, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to monitor and continuously mix the groundwater. However, ex situ treatment requires pumping of groundwater, leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and material handling. ...

  • Slurry Phase Biological Treatment

    Slurry phase biological treatment involves the controlled treatment of excavated soil in a bioreactor. The excavated soil is first processed to physically separate stones and rubble. The soil is then mixed with water to a predetermined concentration dependent upon the concentration of the contaminants, the rate of biodegradation, and the physical nature of the soils. Some processes pre-wash the ...

  • In Situ Biological Treatment for Ground Water, Surface Water, and Leachate

    The main advantage of in situ treatment is that it allows ground water to be treated without being brought to the surface, resulting in significant cost savings. In situ treatment, however, generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the process is more ...

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