bioremediation feasibility study Articles

  • Feasibility study of in-situ bioremediation for nitrobenzene-contaminated groundwater

    Although many studies have simulated in-situ bioremediation of contaminated groundwater, most of them have not considered hydrochemical conditions and indigenous microorganisms, thus potentially rendering results inapplicable to actual in-situ groundwater bioremediation projects. This study focused on a nitrobenzene-contaminated groundwater site located in Jilin City, China. The actual ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • A Feasibility Study for Assessment of In-situ Bioremediation Potential of a Crude Oil Degrading Pseudomonas Consortium

    Following is a link and abstract for an article published in the Journal for Scientific Research wherein a Pseudomonas consortium isolated from a site contaminated with crude oil was applied and effectively used to remediate the same contaminated site under particular environmental conditions.    Link to pdf:  ...


    By CL Solutions, LLC

  • Enhanced Bioremediation

    Introduction Enhanced bioremediation is a process in which indigenous or inoculated micro-organisms (e.g., fungi, bacteria, and other microbes) degrade (metabolize) organic contaminants found in soil and/or ground water, converting them to innocuous end products. Nutrients, oxygen, or other amendments may be used to enhance bioremediation and contaminant desorption from subsurface materials. ...

  • Aerobic and Anaerobic Bioremediation of 1,1-DCE and Vinyl Chloride in Groundwater

    Untitled Document A three-tiered remediation approach is being used for successful field treatment of a 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) groundwater plume. The plume is characterized by ...


    By Regenesis

  • The Use of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) for CAH Bioremediation.

    Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC™) is a simple, passive, low-cost and long-term option for the anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via a reductive dehalogenation pathway. Applications to other classes of chlorinated compounds that are anaerobically degradable by this mechanism are under investigation. HRC should be viewed as a tool for the enhancement of natural ...


    By Regenesis

  • From urban municipalities to polar bioremediation: the characterisation and contribution of biogenic minerals for water treatment

    Minerals of biological origin have shown significant potential for the separation of contaminants from water worldwide. This study details the contribution of biologically derived minerals to water treatment operations, with a focus on filtration media from urban municipalities and remote cold regions. The results support biofilm-embedded iron and manganese to be the building blocks of ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Operating conditions for the continuous bioremediation of free cyanide contaminated wastewater using Aspergillus awamori

    Generation of cyanide-containing wastewater is a growing problem worldwide as numerous cyanide complexes are highly unstable and degrade to form free cyanide (F-CN), the most toxic form of cyanide. Agro-waste materials, such as sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) waste from the citrus industry, are rich in readily metabolisable carbohydrates that can supplement microbial activity and thus support ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • DNAPL in Clay Formation

    PROJECT BACKGROUND At a manufacturing site located in Cookeville, TN, on and offsite soil (tight clays) and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, were discovered as the result of a Phase I and a Phase II investigation. The client entered the State of Tennessee Voluntary Clean-up Oversight and Assistance Program (VCOAP), which resulted in an informal focused feasibility study to ...


    By Regenesis

  • Tacoma, Washington - Well 12A superfund site - Case Study

    Combined Remedies for DNAPL Remediation Project Summary TRS Group, Inc. (TRS) teamed with KEMRON and AMEC, under KEMRON's U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USAGE) Environmental Remediation Services Multiple Award Task Order Contract (MATOC), to perform electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the remediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose zone ...


    By TRS Group, Inc.

  • Slurry Phase Biological Treatment

    Slurry phase biological treatment involves the controlled treatment of excavated soil in a bioreactor. The excavated soil is first processed to physically separate stones and rubble. The soil is then mixed with water to a predetermined concentration dependent upon the concentration of the contaminants, the rate of biodegradation, and the physical nature of the soils. Some processes pre-wash the ...

  • TCE at Department of Defense Landfill Site

    PROJECT BACKGROUND Subsurface investigations at this 40-acre Northern California Department of Defense (DOD) landfill site revealed elevated levels of TCE in site soils and groundwater. This discovery was made through routine site monitoring, as regulated by the state of California solid waste landfill regulations. Regulators required site cleanup to reduce chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations ...


    By Regenesis

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Nonhalogenated SVOCs in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for nonhalogenated SVOCs in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, incineration, and excavation with off-site disposal. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be considered to remediate soils: in situ bioremediation, bioventing, composting, controlled solid phase, or landfarming. Slurry phase biological treatment is also applicable but ...

  • Ex Situ Biological Treatment for Groundwater, Surface Water, and Leachate

    The main advantage of ex situ treatment is that it generally requires shorter time periods, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to monitor and continuously mix the groundwater. However, ex situ treatment requires pumping of groundwater, leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and material handling. ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Halogenated SVOCs in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for halogenated SVOCs in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, dehalogenation, incineration, and excavation with off-site disposal. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be considered to remediate soils: in situ bioremediation, bioventing, composting, controlled solid phase, or landfarming. Slurry phase biological treatment is also ...

  • Field Demonstration of a Permeable Bioreactive Barrier for Leachate Control.

    ABSTRACT: A biostimulation technique was selected for a pilot study to treat groundwater at a former New Jersey municipal landfill. The process will address a mixture of chlorinated compounds (e.g. vinyl chloride and chlorobenzene), hydrocarbons (e.g. benzene and methyl ethyl ketone) and heavy metals. The reactive barrier will be constructed using a series of injection points to implace a slurry ...


    By Regenesis

  • In Situ Biological Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of in situ treatment is that it allows soil to be treated without being excavated and transported, resulting in potentially significant cost savings. However, in situ treatment generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in soil and aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the ...

  • In Situ Biological Treatment for Ground Water, Surface Water, and Leachate

    The main advantage of in situ treatment is that it allows ground water to be treated without being brought to the surface, resulting in significant cost savings. In situ treatment, however, generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the process is more ...

  • Ex Situ Biological Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of ex situ treatment is that it generally requires shorter time periods than in situ treatment, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to homogenize, screen, and continuously mix the soil. However, ex situ treatment requires excavation of soils, leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and ...

  • In-Situ Anaerobic Remediation of Perchlorate-Impacted Soils

    AbstractARCADIS is currently leading the development, evaluation, and selection of a final groundwater remedy for a 94-acre manufacturing facility in the western U.S. This facility has produced small explosives and vehicular safety products since 1957. As a result of historic operations, soil and groundwater at the site have been impacted by perchlorate. To date, remediation efforts have been ...


    By Arcadis

  • Former Dry Cleaning Site Contaminated with PCE - Case Study

    In-Situ® Inc. TROLL® 9500 Multiparameter Sonde helps resolve treatment challenges and saves $200,000 in drilling, reagents, and consulting. A former dry-cleaning site in the Pacific Northwest, Ultra Custom Care Cleaners, was found to be contaminated with PCE (perchloroethylene). According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), PCE was widely used in the dry cleaning of fabrics since the ...


    By In-Situ, Inc.

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