coastal warning technology Articles

  • Acting on disaster warnings: Don`t miss the human factor

    We need to understand why some people act on early warnings while others ignore them, says disaster preparedness specialist Sudhir Kumar. The Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami of 11 March 2011 challenged global ideas about responding to disasters. It showed that structural defences alone, such as breakwaters, coastal dykes and tidal barriers, cannot provide protection ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Your guide to science and technology at Rio+20

    How will science and technology fare at the Rio+20 summit? Aisling Irwin looks at scientists' demands and assesses their chances. Is this the last chance for scientists to save the planet? The UN Conference on Sustainable Development — Rio+20 — enters its final phase of negotiations next week at a summit to be attended by more than 130 heads of state. At stake ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Case Study Norderney LOG_aLevel_ENG

    Northsea Wave and Level Measuring Station In the operation of the research centre coast of the NLWKN–Norden-Norderney Apart from the coastal engineering, the coastal surveying and morphology, the storm tide warning service of the NLWKN-Norden-Norderney belong to the specific questions and tasks of the coastal area. The German Wadden Sea and ...


    By General Acoustics e.K.

  • Sea-level rise and sinking land make deltas extremely vulnerable

    In July 2014 we published a photo essay that highlighted the ecological and economic importance of the world’s deltas, pointing out that they are home to nearly half a billion people and provide critical habitat for innumerable plant and animal species. That photo essay also pointed out the danger deltas face: ...


    By Ensia

  • Why Pacific islands should take on ocean monitoring

    Pacific islands must build capacity for their own environmental monitoring to tackle both local and global problems, says Ben Ponia. Small island developing states are viewed as the early-warning canary for global environmental change. But though they share global problems, many have an eye for economic growth and have become industrialised nations facing their own suite of home-grown ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The case for automatic weirs

    With hosepipe bans returning to parts of the country this summer, it’s easy to forget the disastrous floods of recent years – unless, of course, you were personally affected. This year’s harsh winter and modest levels of spring and summer rainfall belie a growing trend of more extreme weather events hitting the UK and a pattern of warmer winters and wetter summers. As we saw ...


    By Kijlstra LTD.

  • ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT: Algae recruited for waterways clean-up

    Most people have heard about the canary in the cage; the hapless sentinel that warns miners of lethal build-ups of poisonous gas by falling off its perch, dead. Researchers have applied a similar principle to their development of a procedure for identifying and removing toxicants from estuarine and coastal waters, using highly sensitive algae as toxicity test subjects. The use of such ‘lower ...

  • Climate Change and Wealth Creation

    Sir Richard Branson, Chair of the Virgin Group of companies, was once quoted as saying “Climate Change is the biggest wealth creating opportunity of our generation”. He is probably right. Every environmental problem, challenge or risk factor carries with it the potential for solutions, and those solutions often have the makings of a business opportunity. That is ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • 5 Growing Extreme Weather Threats to America’s Cities

    Weather events have been dominating the news recently thanks to the “polar vortex” that caused record cold temperatures across the nation. But just a few months ago, the news was filled with other events: record rain and flooding in Colorado; destructive tornadoes in Oklahoma; widespread drought in the Southwest; and the sluggish recovery from Superstorm Sandy in New Jersey. Unlike ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • How great are the risks posed by climate change?

    The UK government says that climate change poses risks that demand to be treated as seriously as the threat of nuclear war. Scientists from the UK, US, India and China say in a report commissioned by the UK that deciding what to do about climate change depends on the value we put on human life, both now and in years to come. One of ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Deep sea mining — a dangerous experiment

    Pacific governments should not approve deep-sea mining until more is known about its likely impact, says conservation biologist Mellie Samson Jr. Deep sea mining (DSM) is the new frontier in extractive mining. For the companies involved, as well as the governments that own the mining rights, it offers substantial profits. However DSM is still experimental in nature, with ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Watching for Signs of Climate Action in the State of the Union Address

    When President Obama addresses the nation on Tuesday, climate change is expected to be featured. The president recently said that one of his personal passions is “leaving a planet that is as spectacular as the one we inherited from our parents and our grandparents.” The next two years will determine if his administration can meet this standard. Seven months have ...

  • Researchers around the world are learning from indigenous communities. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

    From Canada’s Far North to Australia, pursuing a more respectful relationship between science and traditional knowledge In the rugged Sahtú Region of Canada’s Northwest Territories, a district so remote that in winter only a single treacherous ice road connects it to the outside world, life revolves around caribou. For millennia, the Dene people lived as nomads, ...


    By Ensia

  • Is nuclear power our energy future — or a dinosaur in a death spiral?

    Identical data yield drastically different conclusions about the role nuclear will play in meeting climate goals. Nuclear power is dead. Long live nuclear power. Nuclear power is the only way forward. Nuclear power is a red herring. Nuclear power is too dangerous. Nuclear power is the safest power source around. Nuclear is nothing. Nuclear is everything. It is now generally agreed ...


    By Ensia

  • What will it take to get plastics out of the ocean?

    From drones to filters to artificial islands, innovators are working to reduce the threat thousands of tons of trash pose to marine ecosystems. A few palm trees stand strong in the salty breeze. Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards ...


    By Ensia

  • The number one thing we can do to protect Earth’s oceans

    Marine governance favors consumption and commerce over conservation. Here's what we can do about it. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the ...


    By Ensia

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