combustible dust hazard Articles

  • Understanding the dangers of combustible dust

    Paper shredding is growing into a big business. Recycling and the green movement certainly planted the seeds, but regulators have added the fertilizer. Industry-changing laws have been passed to govern document security in accounting, healthcare and banking, and shredders of many varieties are becoming the tools of those trades.Five or six years ago Warde Comeaux knew only a few people who ...

  • Combustible Dust: It Doesn’t Take Much

    A dust accumulation of 1/32 of an inch deep—about the thickness of a dime—covering just five percent of a room’s surface area doesn’t sound like much, but it’s enough to cause a catastrophic explosion, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Although good engineering and safety practices to prevent dust explosions have existed for decades, there ...


    By SafetySmart

  • Reducing the risk of dust explosion hazards

    In the wake of recent tragic and highly publicized dust explosions, companies are asking, 'Could that happen here?' and 'What can I do to prevent such an incident at my facility?' One approach is to manage dust explosion hazards as though they were subject to OSHA’s Process Safety Management (PSM) requirements (29 CFR 1910.119), even though dust hazards often are not covered under this ...


    By ABS Consulting

  • Vacuuming Wood Dust Can be Hazardous

    It’s well known that wood dust is highly combustible, but the practice of removing it with vacuum trucks can also be dangerous, because of the potential buildup of static electricity. WorkSafeBC has issued a bulletin stating that “static electricity discharges can ignite wood dust and therefore must be eliminated or adequately controlled during vacuuming.” When wood dust or ...


    By SafetySmart

  • Uni-wash wet dust collectors reduce industrial dust hazards

    Metal dust — it can be a fabricator’s worst nightmare. In particular, the combination of dry aluminum dust and steel dust is literally a disaster waiting to happen. The National Fire Protection Association has a list of metal dusts and the specific PPM that the air can hold of each before the serious risk of an explosion arises. As a worksite approaches the PPM safety limits of one or ...


    By ProVent, LLC

  • Dust monitoring

    Generally, two different approaches are used to measure the amount of dust deposited on a surface; Determination of the soiling of a surface, by a change in its properties; Determination of the quantity of dust deposited, by weight. WHAT IS DUST? Dust is a generic term used to describe fine particles that are suspended in the atmosphere. Dust comes from a wide variety of sources, including soil, ...


    By Queensland Laboratory

  • Down with road dust

    There are more than 3.9 million miles of roadway in the United States, according to the Federal Highway Administration, and, depending on the area of the country you're in, as much as 70% of that road mileage is unpaved. The 1997 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Air Quality and Emissions Trends Report states that those unpaved roads--which can cover a wide range of ...


    By Cypher Environmental Ltd.

  • How To Avoid Dust Explosions In Your Baghouse

    A massive fire and explosion in the dust collection system of a New Hampshire wood pellet manufacturer demonstrates the need for adequate system design to prevent combustible dust explosions in general industry.  We recently published a news article on Environmental-Expert.com about OSHA’s enforcement actions concerning last year’s combustible dust fire and explosion at the ...


    By Baghouse.com

  • Waste to energy – processing waste with a high thermal value to substitute combustibles

    With the taking effect of the TASi (Technical Regulations on Estate Waste) in 2005, non-treated waste must no longer be disposed of and deposited. Commercial and industrial residues with a high thermal value such as rejects from paper industry, punchings from rubber and plastics, and other mono-fractions which are characterized by homogeneity and constant combustible properties through mechanical ...


  • Canada Publishes Hazardous Products Regulation

    On February 11, 2015, the Government of Canada published in Gazette II (Vol. 149, no. 3) the final regulation for adopting the Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). The final Hazardous Product Regulation (HPR) appears to be nearly identical to the proposed regulation published in Gazette I in August of 2014 (Vol. 148, no. 32) and is ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Industry Experts Address Solutions for Major Safety and Environmental Hazards and Risks Prevalent in Fossil-Fuel Power Plants

    The upcoming marcus evans HSE Excellence for Fossil Generation Conference — set to take place August 6–8, 2013, in Dallas, Texas — will address critical challenges and lessons learned in the industry to drive solution-based topics, including worksite safety management, confined space, safety training, fall ...


    By Marcus Evans

  • Understanding the potential class II – Division I Safety Hazards present when operating Vertical Cuttings Dryers

    For decades, the industry standard for waste management dryers (a.k.a. vertical cuttings dryers) has relied on belt-driven sheaves. Though belt-driven systems are cost effective and relatively easy to implement, at a minimum they have represented a maintenance nuisance, at worst they represent a serious safety concern when ...


    By Elgin Separation Solutions

  • Biosolids Heat Drying: Safety in Design and Owner Operation

    ABSTRACTInterest continues to grow in heat drying as a means of processing biosolids into an aesthetically pleasing product form with multiple use opportunities, while also achieving a significant reduction in both volume and weight of biosolids for off-site hauling. As the number of heat drying installations increase, so too do reports of safety incidents—an indication that Owners and facility ...

  • Housekeeping at Work – Don’t Sweep It Under the Rug

    What’s at Stake? Housekeeping at work is about much more than cleaning windows and sweeping up dust bunnies. Poor housekeeping can cause injuries, slow down production, dampen morale, start fires and cause catastrophic explosions of combustible dusts. What’s the Danger? A messy workplace not only affects workers’ ...


    By SafetySmart

  • A STIEFEL project UTO Uvrier case study

    The waste incineration plant UTO Uvrier is situated in the south western part of Switzerland. The Association which controls the plant was established in 1969 and treats waste from 44 municipalities with a combined population of 170,000 inhabitants. The principal task of UTO Uvrier is the thermal heat recovery from urban and industrial waste. Apart from this, UTO also treats other types of waste ...


    By Jakob Stiefel GmbH

  • Incineration

    Introduction: High temperatures, 870 to 1,200 °C (1,400 to 2,200 °F), are used to volatilize and combust (in the presence of oxygen) halogenated and other refractory organics in hazardous wastes. Often auxiliary fuels are employed to initiate and sustain combustion. The destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) for properly operated incinerators exceeds the 99.99% requirement for hazardous waste ...

  • Keep Your Auger Conveyor Running Smoothly - Case Study

    A commercial auger conveyor is an efficient way to move raw materials from one area to another with little to no spillage. However, screw conveyors can develop or create other problems. Here are some ways to solve some of the more common issues you may encounter. Dust Problems Dust in the atmosphere can be a serious ...

  • Gas safety in confined spaces

    An engineer repairs buried cables; a plant manager enters a small plant room; a contractor inspects the lining of a sewage pipe.  All these personnel face a common danger, despite working in widely different industries.  Gas-related injury poses a serious threat in any confined space where the free movement of air is limited.  ...

  • Gas Safety in Confined Spaces

    Introduction A confined space is any space large enough for someone to enter and perform assigned work, which has limited means of entry or exit, and which is not designed for continuous worker occupancy. This covers just about every industry, including utilities, construction, hydrocarbon exploration and processing, petrochemicals, marine, agriculture, food processing and brewing, as ...

  • Gas safety in confined spaces

    A confined space is any space large enough for someone to enter and perform assigned work, which has limited means of entry or exit, and which is not designed for continuous worker occupancy. This covers just about every industry, including utilities, construction, hydrocarbon exploration and processing, petrochemicals, marine, agriculture, food processing and ...

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