combustible gas leak Articles

  • Paint booths, or areas using combustible gases: why a requirement for combustible gas monitor might be necessary

    Paint booths save time and ensure a smooth and professional application of paint in a range of industries, including automotive, aerospace, home decor, furniture, and more. Combustible gases and fluids in the paint booth environment can pose a health hazard if something goes wrong. Explore the hidden dangers of paint booth fluids and gases, and learn how a ...

  • Identifying Leaks from Natural Gas Pipelines at a Safe Distance

    The use of natural gas, of which methane is the principle component, is increasing worldwide. According to the American Petroleum Institute methane meets 24% of U.S. energy demand and heats over 50% of all U.S. households. It also has many industrial uses, such as the manufacture of chemicals like ammonia, methanol, butane, ethane, propane and acetic acid; it is also an ingredient in products as ...

  • Chlorine Safety and Prevention: How to Protect Yourself from Chlorine Leaks

    While chlorine gas is widely used in swimming pools, water treatment facilities, cleaning products, pharmaceutical products, and in many other industries, the gas is highly toxic when handled improperly. Training your workers on how to safely use chlorine is one part of health and safety best practices; monitoring your workplace for chlorine leaks is another. Learn about the hidden dangers in ...

  • Gas Safety in Confined Spaces

    Introduction An offshore worker ensures a vessel is safe to enter; a plant manager enters a small plant room; a contractor inspects the lining of a sewage pipe.  All these personnel face common dangers, despite working in widely different industries.  Gas-related injury poses a serious threat in any confined space where the free movement of air is limited. A confined space ...

  • Gas safety in confined spaces

    An engineer repairs buried cables; a plant manager enters a small plant room; a contractor inspects the lining of a sewage pipe.  All these personnel face a common danger, despite working in widely different industries.  Gas-related injury poses a serious threat in any confined space where the free movement of air is limited.  ...

  • Compressed Gas Safety Guide

    Use and storage of any compressed gas under high pressure can be extremely dangerous if proper gas handling procedures are not observed. Moreover, chemical characteristics of specialty gases themselves can pose serious health hazards if containment is not tightly controlled. Paying close attention to a compressed gas product’s technical and safety information is invaluable for maintaining a safe, ...

  • Gas safety in confined spaces

    A confined space is any space large enough for someone to enter and perform assigned work, which has limited means of entry or exit, and which is not designed for continuous worker occupancy. This covers just about every industry, including utilities, construction, hydrocarbon exploration and processing, petrochemicals, marine, agriculture, food processing and ...

  • Gas Safety in Confined Spaces

    Introduction A confined space is any space large enough for someone to enter and perform assigned work, which has limited means of entry or exit, and which is not designed for continuous worker occupancy. This covers just about every industry, including utilities, construction, hydrocarbon exploration and processing, petrochemicals, marine, agriculture, food processing and brewing, as ...

  • Is your Plant as tight as you think? Leak Detector for extremely toxic Gases, a Field Test Report

    Leak detection of commodity gases in chemical plants is a day-to-day practice. The sensor technology available for this application is field proven and reliable. No question about it, existing sensors will do the job. However, in plants manufacturing or handling extremely toxic substances, the picture is different. For example, take phosgene. The existing sensor technology for leak detection ...

  • Danger and Detection of Hydrogen Sulphide Gas in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production

    A rig worker smells rotten eggs near the well head, rubs his itchy eyes as he investigates the frosty pipe connections. After a few moments, he believes all is fine as he no longer smells the tell-tale hydrogen sulphide odour. In this scenario, we can only hope the worker recognises the danger and quickly leaves the site. Oil fields, especially mature ones, can produce hydrogen sulphide gas ...

  • Gas detector communication technology for offshore oil and gas platforms

    In few applications is safety as important as on offshore oil and gas platforms. Explosive hazards from hydrocarbon gases and vapours are an ever-present risk, whilst toxic hydrogen sulphide gas and depleted oxygen environments can pose significant risks to personnel. Gas detectors are therefore essential to provide dependable early warning of gas hazards. Gas detectors are permanently installed ...

  • Pt. 3 - IN the MIX - Construction Safety and Gas Detection

    In our last blog (part 2 of 4) we consulted the OSHA Construction eTOOL to determine the factors that require a Gas Monitor. In this Blog (part 3 of 4) we explore Certified AIR ...


  • Detecting Hydrogen Gas and Fires: Seeing the Unseen

    Hydrogen usage is growing. The general public sees and reads about hydrogen as an alternative fuel for cars. However, the big use for hydrogen is found in hydrocarbon processing and other important manufacturing processes. Hydrogen is the first element on the periodic table and is an essential element in the manufacturing of many of our everyday products. We must have respect for its explosive ...

  • IR Gas Detector Provides Rapid Response

    The advanced Model IR400 Point IR Combustible Gas Detector from General Monitors features an industry-leading three-second T90 response time to the presence of combustible hydrocarbon-based gases, which allows plant operators to respond quickly to gas leaks and ...


    By General Monitors

  • Fixed Versus Portable Gas Detection – Which Is Better?

    Did you know that workers are needlessly injured every year as a result of leaking toxic or combustible substances? Such incidents are known to involve a wide range of hazardous gases (including ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, hydrocarbon vapors and so on). The sad reality is that most of these accidents are avoidable if only the workplace is adequately monitored. This leads ...

  • Run cars on green electricity, not natural gas

    With the dramatic increase in oil prices earlier this year translating into higher prices at the gas pump in the United States, concerns over US dependence on foreign oil are once again part of the national discussion on energy security. Combined with the growing understanding that carbon emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are driving global climate change, the debate is now focused on ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Developing Technologies to Detect Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Gas

    Abstract Hydrogen sulfi de (H2S) gas can cause nausea, headaches, unconsciousness, and death. Industries struggle to detect this deadly substance before it harms workers or communities. Safety system manufacturers have developed detectors that sense the H2S quickly and accurately. This paper illustrates, in general terms, considerations in effective placement of H2S detectors: ...

  • Selecting and Placing Gas Detectors for Maximum Application Protection

    Many industrial processes involve dangerous gases and vapors: flammable, toxic, or both. With the different sensing technologies available, and the wide range of industrial applications that exist, selecting the best sensor and locating them properly for the job at hand can be a challenge. To ensure a high level of safety, know the latest sensing technologies, which technology is best for the ...

  • Total solution: Gas and particulate analysis in Cement industry

    Cement plants are increasingly required to install continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS). While these represent a significant financial outlay, a range of other factors also need to be considered when selecting a suitable CEMS. To the inexperienced, selecting a suitable CEM can mistakenly be considered as simply ensuring that the applicable national regulations (eg MACT in the USA, ...


    By Environnement S.A

  • Global solution: Gas and particulate analysis in Cement industry

    Cement plants are increasingly required to install continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS). While these represent a significant financial outlay, a range of other factors also need to be considered when selecting a suitable CEMS. To the inexperienced, selecting a suitable CEM can mistakenly be considered as simply ensuring that the applicable national regulations (eg MACT in the USA, ...


    By Environnement S.A

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you