deep ocean research Articles

  • Researchers date ancient water deep beneath earth’s surface

    When a pocket of ancient water was discovered deep beneath the Earth in 2013, a team of Canadian researchers estimated it to be roughly 1.5 billion years old. At the same site, they discovered a deeper pocket of water estimated to be at least 2 billion years old, making it the oldest water on the planet. Barbara Sherwood Lollar, a University of Toronto professor who led the team that discovered ...


    By Fluence Corporation

  • Deep sea mining: exploration is inevitable

    Despite concern over adverse impacts, deep marine mineral exploration is set to become a global industry, says geologist Chris Yeats. Global demand for metals continues to grow, fuelled largely by increasing populations and the industrialisation and urbanisation of China and India. To meet this demand, the international ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Deep sea mining — a dangerous experiment

    Pacific governments should not approve deep-sea mining until more is known about its likely impact, says conservation biologist Mellie Samson Jr. Deep sea mining (DSM) is the new frontier in extractive mining. For the companies involved, as well as the governments that own the mining rights, it offers substantial profits. However DSM is still experimental in nature, with ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Ocean carbon: A dent in the iron hypothesis

    Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the ...

  • Long-term impacts of deep-sea mineral mining

    A new international study has demonstrated that deep-sea nodule mining will cause long-lasting damage to deep-sea life. This study, led by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), was the first to review all the available information on the impacts of small-scale sea-floor disturbances simulating mining activity. It found clear impacts on marine ecosystems from deep-sea nodule mining ...

  • In the depths of the oceans, human activities are beginning to take their toll

    Once seen as too remote to harm, the deep sea is facing new pressures from mining, pollution, overfishing and more. Imagine sinking into the deepest parts of the Central Pacific Ocean, somewhere between Mexico and Hawaii. Watch as the water turns from clear to blue to dark blue to black. And then continue on for another 15,000 feet (4,600 meters) to the seafloor — roughly the ...


    By Ensia

  • Is pH a red herring when it comes to ocean acidification?

    New research points to saturation state, not pH, as the most pressing metric to track when it comes to shellfish survival. In 2007, the owners of Whiskey Creek oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast lost almost all of their larvae — and had no idea why. The only clue was that the larval die-offs often occurred during intense upwelling events, when ...


    By Ensia

  • Time to stop losing ocean data to vandalism

    More must be done to prevent damage of ocean data buoys that costs money, vital data — and lives, say Sidney Thurston and M. Ravichandran. The global community relies on a rapidly expanding ocean observing network to understand the climate and ecosystems, to help warn against ocean-borne hazards such as tsunamis and storm surges caused by cyclones, and to support sea rescue ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • What will it take to get plastics out of the ocean?

    From drones to filters to artificial islands, innovators are working to reduce the threat thousands of tons of trash pose to marine ecosystems. A few palm trees stand strong in the salty breeze. Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards ...


    By Ensia

  • The number one thing we can do to protect Earth’s oceans

    Marine governance favors consumption and commerce over conservation. Here's what we can do about it. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the ...


    By Ensia

  • NASA Science Zeros in on Ocean Rise: How Much? How Soon?

    Seas around the world have risen an average of nearly 3 inches since 1992, with some locations rising more than 9 inches due to natural variation, according to the latest satellite measurements from NASA and its partners. An intensive research effort now underway, aided by NASA observations and analysis, points to an unavoidable rise of several feet in the future. Members of NASA's new ...

  • Top 5 ways marine researchers are currently using Underwater Drones

    Marine researchers around the world are utilizing Deep Trekker Underwater Drones (or ROVs) in their marine projects; here are the top 5 applications being used today. In a few weeks, the world will gather in San Diego, California for the Oceanology International North America exhibition. It will bring together ...


    By Deep Trekker Inc.

  • Undersea storage for US carbon emissions

    Researchers are working hard on methods to mitigate, reduce or compensate for CO2 emissions. One of these, geological carbon sequestration, involves injecting CO2 into deep saline aquifers, or depleted oil and gas reservoirs so that it is not released into the atmosphere where it contributes to global warming. Now US researchers have found a potential new location for undersea CO2 storage, which ...

  • New monitoring technology helps reveal Arctic secrets

    A group of Arctic researchers has employed the latest monitoring technology to investigate the effects of climate change, by measuring temperature and salinity in the water column beneath surface ice. The results of the investigation, which utilised YSI’s new 'Castaway-CTD', could cast new light on our understanding of the ways in which shifting ocean currents impact upon the climate in ...

  • Water Preservation: What YOU Can Do

    If you’re presently reading this blog, you probably truly appreciate and understand something in which we all have a passionate interest. Water! We rely on water for hydration, irrigation, transportation, energy production, food production, weather patterns and so much more. Lakes, oceans, rivers and reservoirs across the Globe are part of the pillars that sustain life. If you are ...


    By Deep Trekker Inc.

  • Case study - SEAWATCH Greece - POSEIDON

    Fugro was selected in 1995 by the Puertos del Estado (Coast and Harbour Authorities) in Spain to execute the contract for the project: "Warning and Observation Network for the Marine Environment in Spanish Coastal Waters (instrumentation and control)". Fugro OCEANOR started implementation of the first generation operational oceanographic forecasting system for Greece in 1998. The system named ...


    By Fugro OCEANOR AS

  • Valeport Supports Search for New Marine Discoveries

    Valeport’s latest CTD profiler is supporting scientists with leading edge research to expand knowledge of marine biodiversity. The fastCTD profiler has been designed to deliver the ...


    By Valeport Ltd

  • Climate change and the US energy sector

    As President Obama emphasized in his speech at Georgetown University in June 2013, climate change is happening. It is here, it is now, and as Obama warned, “Our planet is changing in ways that will have profound impacts on all of humankind.” But what are these effects? The President reels off examples: sea levels in New York harbour increasing by a foot in depth over the past century, ...

  • Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sink Potential: A Possible Contribution to Mitigating Global Warming

    Introduction Climate researcher Klaus Hasselmann, Director of the Max-Planck-Institut (MPI) for Meteorology in Hamburg and a project co-ordinator of EC’s Environment and Climate Programme, was one of the first scientists to warn that recently observed global warming trends have a discernible human related forcing component. Climate model calculations show, that global warming is closely related ...


  • Global study of lakes enhances understanding of hydrological cycle

    We now have much more robust data available on the amount of water in lakes worldwide thanks to a comprehensive database created by researchers at McGill University in Montreal. The McGill scientists discovered the total shoreline of the world’s lakes is more than four times longer than the global ocean coastline. At 7 million kilometers, this is 10 times the distance from the Earth to the ...


    By Fluence Corporation

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