ex-situ heavy metals contaminated soil stabilization Articles

  • In Situ Solidification/Stabilization

    Introduction Solidification/stabilization (S/S) reduces the mobility of hazardous substances and contaminants in the environment through both physical and chemical means. Unlike other remedial technologies, S/S seeks to trap or immobilize contaminants within their 'host' medium (i.e., the soil, sand, and/or building materials that contain them), instead of removing them through chemical or ...

  • Soil Washing

    Introduction: Soil washing is a water-based process for scrubbing soils ex situ to remove contaminants. The process removes contaminants from soils in one of two ways: By dissolving or suspending them in the wash solution (which can be sustained by chemical manipulation of pH for a period of time). By concentrating them into a smaller volume of soil through particle size ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Inorganics in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The most commonly used treatment technologies for inorganics in soil, sediment, and sludge include solidification/stabilization (S/S), excavation and off-site disposal, and acid extraction. These treatment technologies are described briefly below. Solidification processes produce monolithic blocks of waste with high structural integrity. The contaminants do not necessarily interact chemically ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Radionuclides in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Unlike organic contaminants (and similar to metals), radionuclides cannot be destroyed or degraded; therefore, remediation technologies applicable to radionuclides involve separation, concentration/volume reduction, and/or immobilization. The most commonly used treatment technology for radionuclides in soil, sediment, and sludge is solidification/stabilization (S/S). This treatment technology is ...

  • Data Requirements for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Site soil conditions frequently limit the selection of a treatment process. Process-limiting characteristics such as pH or moisture content may sometimes be adjusted. In other cases, a treatment technology may be eliminated based upon the soil classification (e.g., particle-size distribution) or other soil characteristics. Soils are inherently variable in their physical and chemical ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Inorganics in Ground Water, Surface Water, and Leachate

    It may be necessary to know other subsurface information to remediate inorganics in ground water, surface water, and leachate. Treatability studies are usually necessary to ensure that the contaminated ground water can be treated effectively at the design flow. A subsurface geologic characterization would be particularly important to characterize the effects of adsorption and other processes of ...

  • The Bioremediation Process

    Bioremediation allows natural processes to clean up harmful chemicals in the environment. Microscopic 'bugs' or microbes that live in soil and groundwater like to eat certain harmful chemicals, such as those found in gasoline and oil spills. When microbes completely digest these chemicals, they change them into water and harmless gases such as carbon dioxide. In order for microbes to clean up ...


  • Enhanced Bioremediation

    Introduction Enhanced bioremediation is a process in which indigenous or inoculated micro-organisms (e.g., fungi, bacteria, and other microbes) degrade (metabolize) organic contaminants found in soil and/or ground water, converting them to innocuous end products. Nutrients, oxygen, or other amendments may be used to enhance bioremediation and contaminant desorption from subsurface materials. ...

  • Thermal Desorption

    Untitled Document Introduction: ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you