groundwater infrastructure management Articles

  • GroundWater Markup Language (GWML) – enabling groundwater data interoperability in spatial data infrastructures

    Increasing stress on global groundwater resources is leading to new approaches to the management and delivery of groundwater data. These approaches include the deployment of a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) to enable online data interoperability amongst numerous and heterogeneous data sources. Often an important component of an SDI is a global domain schema, which serves as a central structure ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Necessary driving forces for infrastructure sustainability

    The forces and complex interactions that hinder and promote the application of sustainable infrastructures are discussed along with changes that are needed in our economic-mindset for evaluating project costs. Some existing sustainable projects result from favourable economics. However, many fall in the trash basket as a result of so-called unfavourable economics. One of the key driving forces ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Who Owns Groundwater?

    California’s drought underscores the need to improve how the state - and the rest of us - divvy up a resource in demand. Grapevines march across wires strung along rolling hills, their little trunks improbably supporting heavy black fruit. Cindy Steinbeck’s family has been farming this land since 1920. They grow Zinfandel, Viognier, Cabernet, Merlot, and Petite Syrah grapes but are ...


    By Ensia

  • An Infrastructure Grows · Decentralized Treatment and Recycling Domestic Wastewater

    THE TERM, “decentralized waste-water management,” refers to the process of treating and discharging treated wastewater in the local vicinity where it is generated. Decentralized systems typically use the soil as the final receptor of the treated wastewater instead of discharging to surface waters, which are generally the receptors of treated wastewater from larger centralized treatment plants. ...


  • Optimal planning of water and wastewater management infrastructure for insular areas: the role of water reuse

    The present article estimates the financial benefits of water reuse by calculating the annualised total cost of water and wastewater management, using mixed integer linear programming. The programme is using as input: geographical data, population distribution, and groundwater availability (for a given area), to calculate the qualitative localised water needs, and to estimate the sizes and ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Rethinking Big Water - Is It Time For A New Approach To Municipal Water Infrastructure?

    Las Vegas has long served as a stereotype of human excess: gambling, drinking, sex, all-you-can-eat buffets. But the latest chapter is playing out away from the Strip, in the part of the valley where two decades of booming development have swelled the population to 2 million residents who rely on a dwindling water supply. Ninety percent of the southwestern U.S. city’s drinking water comes ...


    By Ceres

  • London Region Develops “Intelligent” Infrastructure for the HELP Clean Water Project

    For progressive municipalities, forward thinking about infrastructure can pay huge dividends down the road. In London region, the HELP Clean Water Funding Initiative (Huron-Elgin-London Project Clean Water) was started to create sustainable water supply for a major population hub in Ontario. The project has been 11 years in the making, with ...


    By Pure Technologies

  • Climate change adaptation in rural India: A green infrastructure approach

    Water is a scarce resource in India, especially in the state of Maharashtra, where most rainfall is limited to the monsoon season from June through September. The Government of India has long promoted a Participatory Watershed Development (PWD) approach to deal with this scarcity, focusing on technical and social interventions to ...

  • Landfill groundwater monitoring network design and construction quality assurance (CQA)

    The site is an active landfill site situated in the north east of England.  The company managing the site was unhappy with the groundwater monitoring infrastructure around the site margins. ESI Ltd was commissioned to advise on locating and designing ten groundwater monitoring wells.  Following agreement with the Environment Agency, we also provided independent construction quality ...

  • Water resources and management in Tunisia

    This paper focuses on the work done through the INRGREF to collect and analyse available information on water resources in Tunisia. It presents the quantity and quality of surface and groundwater resources data. Water resources in Tunisia are characterised by scarcity and a pronounced irregularity. Tunisia has been able to develop a complex and diverse water infrastructure allowing the country to ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Management of Hazardous Wastes

    ' Management of hazardous waste is a growing concern in many countries. The long-term impacts and costs of improper disposal can be very high and the emphasis must be on prevention. A comprehensive management system should include (i) policies, institutions and effective regulations and (ii) adequate and acceptable disposal facilities (either public or private). This note outlines the key ...


    By The World Bank

  • Managing the Earth from Space: Satellite and sensing technology in water management

    Approximately 200 miles above the Earth’s surface, two satellites circle the planet, always between 106 and 193 miles apart. But while these twins—called Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)—live in space, they’re providing invaluable assistance in managing natural resources on the ground. GRACE has created a unique picture of ...

  • Environmental risk management: Leaving little to chance

    Life is risky at the best of times. And identifying and managing risks – in the environment, industry and financial markets – has become a priority for business and governments everywhere. Everyone knows what can go wrong. Environmental accidents, corporate scandals and financial imprudence have rung up damage bills in the billions of dollars. So the heat is on to find ways to better manage and ...

  • The City Blueprint of Amsterdam: an assessment of integrated water resources management in the capital of the Netherlands

    In this study the sustainability of integrated water resources management in Amsterdam has been reviewed using the City Blueprint approach. The City Blueprint® is a set of 24 dedicated indicators divided over eight categories, i.e., water security, water quality, drinking water, sanitation, infrastructure, climate robustness, biodiversity and attractiveness, and governance including ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Low impact development: San Francisco’s green approach to stormwater management

    This paper presents the methods, findings, and policy implications of a comprehensive evaluation of low impact development (LID) techniques for the City of San Francisco. LID is an innovative approach to stormwater management that relies on decentralized, small-scale stormwater facilities and site-design techniques to reduce wet weather flows and to remove stormwater pollutants. The LID analysis ...

  • A step towards decentralized wastewater management in the Lower Jordan Rift Valley

    In order to address serious concerns over public health, water scarcity and groundwater pollution in Jordan, the expansion of decentralized wastewater treatment and reuse (DWWT&R) systems to small communities is one of the goals defined by the Jordan government in the “Water Strategy 2009–2022”. This paper evaluates the general potential of decentralized wastewater system solutions to be applied ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Managed aquifer recharge: rediscovering nature as a leading edge technology

    Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) has rapidly increased in Australia, USA, and Europe in recent years as an efficient means of recycling stormwater or treated sewage effluent for non-potable and indirect potable reuse in urban and rural areas. Yet aquifers have been relied on knowingly for water storage and unwittingly for water treatment for millennia. Hence if ‘leading edge’ is defined as ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Optimizing water management in hydraulic fracturing for shale oil and gas production

    Centralized treatment of wastewater is emerging as a viable solution for long-term efficiency in managing water sourcing and wastewater treatment in hydraulic fracturing. The number of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) shale oil and gas wells in the United States continues to increase. Within the Bakken Shale formation alone, in North Dakota and Montana, upwards of 15,000 hydraulic fracturing ...


    By WesTech Engineering, Inc.

  • Optimizing Water Management in Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Oil and Gas Production

    Centralized treatment of wastewater is emerging as a viable solution for long-term efficiency in managing water sourcing and wastewater treatment in hydraulic fracturing. The number of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) shale oil and gas wells in the United States continues to increase. Within the Bakken Shale formation alone, in North Dakota and Montana, upwards of 15,000 hydraulic fracturing ...


    By WesTech Engineering, Inc.

  • Innovative water supply and disposal technologies as integral part of Integrated Water Resources Management: an example from Namibia

    In semi-arid to arid countries water supply challenges will increase in the future with demographic and climate change putting pressure on available resources. Water supply and disposal paradigms of the temperate zone are unsuitable to address these challenges. Innovative water supply and wastewater treatment technologies that are embedded into a holistic integrated water resources management ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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