human health risk Articles

  • Contamination of groundwater and the risk to human health

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water in many parts of the world. In industrialised countries, there is increasing concern that groundwater reserves are being contaminated by industrial effluents and the chemical pesticides and fertilizers used in intensive farming. This paper compares some of the existing guidelines for acceptable concentrations of certain common contaminants in ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Environmental and human health risks of aerosolized silver nanoparticles

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are gaining attention from the academic and regulatory communities, not only because of their antimicrobial effects and subsequent product applications, but also because of their potential health and environmental risks. Whereas AgNPs in the aqueous phase are under intensive study, those in the atmosphere have been largely overlooked, although it is well established ...

  • Hormesis: considerations and implications for human health risk assessment

    The concept of hormesis as a phenomenon is presented, in the context of its evolving definitions. Predominant types of hormetic effect and potential examples thereof are discussed, focusing on chemicals. The potential for hormesis to affect regulatory approaches and several basic processes used in formulating risk assessment parameters, such as study design, interpretation of dose-response ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Environment and human health

    In 2010, the comprehensive European environment - State and outlook 2010 report showed that environmental policies have delivered substantial progress in improving the state of the environment in Europe. However, it also stressed that major environmental challenges remain. Water and air pollution have declined but not enough to achieve good ecological quality in all water bodies or to ensure good ...

  • Copper in human health

    Copper is an essential mineral for human health and at the same time can be toxic, depending upon the amounts ingested. Copper is associated with bone health, immune function and increased frequency of infections, cardiovascular risk and alterations in cholesterol metabolism. Its metabolism is tightly intertwined with other microminerals and its deficiency is known to impair iron mobilisation, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Sediment dioxin levels as the basis for risk assessment and human health criteria

    Methods for assessing human health risks and establishing water quality criteria under the Clean Water Act are based on the assumption that fish accumulation of dioxin is correlated with the dissolved phase of the dioxin in the water column by a water-to-fish predictive factor called a bioconcentration factor. However, dioxin does not remain dissolved in the water column to any significant ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Human health risk assessment of triclosan in land‐applied biosolids

    Triclosan (TCS; 5‐chloro‐2‐[2,4‐dichlorophenoxy]‐phenol) is an antimicrobial agent found in a variety of pharmaceutical and personal care products. Numerous studies have examined the occurrence and environmental fate of TCS in wastewater, biosolids, biosolids‐amended soils, and plants and organisms exposed to biosolids‐amended soils. TCS has a propensity to adhere to organic carbon in ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Fuzzy assessment of human-health risks due to air pollution

    Uncertainty of input data creates fuzzy conditions for assessing and forecasting ecological risk and risks associated with human health due to environmental pollution. Many uncertainties are difficult to eliminate and they do not have sufficient structure so that they can be modelled or described by probabilities and probability processes. This paper describes the application of a formalism of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Factors affecting the performance and risks to human health of on-site wastewater treatment systems

    Aerobic wastewater treatment systems (aerobic systems) are the preferred choice in a region overlying a karstic aquifer used for drinking water supplies, as they are thought to provide better protection to groundwater and human health than standard septic systems. However, aerobic systems in operation do not always perform to design standard; while this is often blamed on lack of maintenance, few ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Human biomonitoring to define occupational exposure and health risks in waste incinerator plants

    A contribution to the research on the relationship between exposure to ambient pollutants and diseases comes from human biomonitoring data collection and interpretation. The 21 biomonitoring studies reviewed are mainly aimed at providing either information on exposure amongst worker subgroups, serving as a reference, or information on the relationship between exposure and toxicity. Attention was ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • A tiered assessment framework to evaluate human health risk of contaminated sediment

    For sediment contaminated with bioaccumulative pollutants (e.g., PCBs and organochorine pesticides), human consumption of seafood that have bioaccumulated sediment‐derived contaminants is a well‐established exposure pathway. Historically, regulation and management of this bioaccumulation pathway has focused on site‐specific risk assessment. The state of California (USA) is supporting the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Electric and magnetic fields as possible risk factors for human health

    Modern society is exposed daily to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) generated by home/environmental human activity. The question of the possible risk to health by long-term exposure to weak fields became a concern in that even small health effects could have profound public health implications. The knowledge of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields still contains certain gaps which should ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Risk Assessment/Toxicology Promotes Health and Welfare of Humans and Ecosystems

    Hundreds of regulations protecting the health and welfare of humans and ecosystems impact industrial and legal firms every day. Commonly, these regulations are associated with protecting human health and the environment from risks associated with site cleanup and closure or remediation projects. Other major health risk regulations are derived from Natural Resources Damage Assessment (NRDA), ...


    By AECOM

  • Human health risk assessment of an arsenic contaminated golf course

    St Michael’s Jubilee Golf Course in Widnes was constructed between 1964 and 1986, by re-grading chemical waste deposits generated from local industries, which were then covered with a thin layer of topsoil and grassed over.  An estimated 4.5 million tonnes of waste materials are present beneath the golf course.  The site is underlain by alluvium and a major aquifer, the Sherwood ...

  • Ecological and Human Health Risk Assessment: Focussing on complex chemical risk assessment and the identification of highest risk conditions

    The mission of the Joint Research Centre, which is a Directorate General of the European Commission, is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support to the EU policy making process, ensuring support to the implementation and monitoring of existing policies and responding to new policy demands. The way that the Joint Research Centre accomplishes its customer-driven tasks is mainly ...


  • Modeling Tip: How to Import BREEZE AERMOD files into BREEZE Risk Analyst for Human Health Risk Assessments

    Humans can be exposed to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) either directly through inhalation or indirectly through ingestion or dermal contact, which can result in acute or chronic health effects. The risk of exposure varies depending on a number of variables, including the meteorological conditions, local geographical and emissions characteristics, the age of the individuals being exposed, and ...

  • Effect of mercury on the human health and environment: an overview

    This article aims to review and to demonstrate the effect of mercury on the human health and environment. Mercury is one of the 12 toxic pollutants identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency and can be toxic at low levels in the environment. Mercury can stay in the atmosphere for up to a year. When released to the air, mercury is transported and deposited globally. Mercury ultimately ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Mercury Contamination in Turtles and Implications for Human Health

    Mercury contamination threatens many ecosystems worldwide. Methylmercury bioaccumlates at each trophic level, and biomagnifies within individuals over time. Long-lived turtles often occupy high trophic positions and are likely to accumulate mercury in contaminated habitats. Millions of turtles worldwide are sold in Asia for human consumption, and consumers may be at risk if turtles contain high ...

  • Human health and trenbolone residue in bovine meat

    In recent years, hormones and hormone–like compounds have been frequently used in vegetable and livestock production to obtain a high yield performance in a shorter period of time. These anabolic agents are used for increasing the rate of weight gain, improving the feed efficiency, storing protein and decreasing fatness (Sawaya et al., 1998). But depending on the use of anabolics in animal feed, ...


    By University of Tehran

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you