ice precipitation sensor Articles

  • Safe Landings Whatever the Weather: Lufft Sensors on Airports

    Pilots, air traffic controllers and airport operators do their best to make air travel safer and more efficient. Sometimes, however, flight security depends on external factors we can hardly influence. This especially refers to risky weather conditions: Strong winds, icy cold or strong precipitation can have serious consequences. On average, 23% of all aircraft accidents and 68% of canceled ...

  • How Your Road Weather Stations Remain Precise into Old Age

    When the temperature is below zero and the fog settles on fields and trees like a veil, the world becomes white as in a fairy tale. But what seems so idyllic white entails risks, because the road is now covered by a fine white ice layer. No one can see with the naked eye how thick or slippery this ice layer is exactly. This can only be measured by technical assistants such as automatic ice ...

  • Stop metal losses in processes with Sulphide, Cyanide, Ammonia and Pressure Fluctuations

    Abstract Losses of metal are often traced to incorrect pH/ORP signals in floatation, leaching, extraction, electrolysis, and precipitation processes, aggravated by pressure changes. IC Controls a Canadian mining sensor manufacturer developed a new superior pH/ORP sensor that stops metal losses, reduces environmental footprint and contributes to sustainability. The cause of incorrect pH/ORP ...


    By IC Controls Ltd.

  • Wind turbine controlling of the future

    Higher, more robust, more reliable: Parallel to the growing requirements for wind turbines, the requirements for monitoring sensors grow as well. But how can wind sensor manufacturers fulfil these wishes? And how should a future wind sensors look like? After analysing the current conditions and trends on the wind energy market, our CEO Klaus Hirzel compiled a wish list for future wind sensors. ...

  • Q&A: Patrick Wagnon on glaciers and climate change

    Patrick Wagnon is a glaciologist at the Institute of Research for Development in France, and a visiting scientist at the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development in Kathmandu, Nepal. As a global ‘glacier chaser’, he has summited some of the highest mountains in the world, including the 8,516 metre Lhotse in the Himalayas. In 2001, Wagnon and his fellow glaciologist ...


    By SciDev.Net

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