lake ecosystem science Articles

  • The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Water and Wetlands

    The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) is an international initiative to draw attention to the benefits of biodiversity. It focuses on the values of biodiversity and ecosystem services, the growing costs of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation, and the benefits of action addressing these pressures. The TEEB initiative has brought together over five hundred authors and ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Understanding and Managing the Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Ecosystems

    There is mounting evidence that climate-changeinduced extreme events are expected to adversely affect the aquatic ecosystems and ecosystem services that they provide. To address this need to understand how climate, aquatic ecological, and social systems interact and how to manage these coupled systems, LimnoTech is participating with a large team of researchers (from Stanford University, the ...


    By LimnoTech Inc.

  • Bringing ecosystem markets to scale in the Southern United States

    For the most part, Ecosystem Markets still linger in the early stages of development. There is much more theoretical work to be done to set up environmental credit markets, including carbon offsets and payments for watershed services. But more pilot projects can also help these markets evolve and show how they might work in the real world. Development pressures in the U.S. South often mean ...

  • Monitoring mixing dynamics in Toolik Lake, Alaska

    Toolik Lake is 130 miles south of Prudhoe Bay in northern Alaska. It is one of the main monitoring sites of the Arctic Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) project and a site for studies led by Sally MacIntyre of the University of California investigating the linkages between hydrodynamics and ecosystem function. Both studies are funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. It is classified as ...

  • Nutrient variation in an urban lake Chain and its consequences for phytoplankton production

    In the Central Arizona–Phoenix (CAP) ecosystem, managers divert mixed stream water and groundwater to maintain an artificial lake chain in Indian Bend Wash (IBW), a historically flashy, ephemeral, desert stream. Nutrient concentrations in the CAP ecosystem's groundwater, stream water, and floodwater differ: stream water has low concentrations of both inorganic N and P, while groundwater is low in ...

  • Managing Great Lakes Water Levels Adaptively in Response to Changing Climate Conditions

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain an abundance of fresh water, collectively representing approximately 20% of the fresh surface water available globally. Despite the enormity of this resource, water levels and flows in the Great Lakes are subject to fluctuations caused by changing climate conditions that have cascading impacts on the coastal ecosystem and the regional economy. Proactive ...


    By LimnoTech Inc.

  • Watershed land use controls on chemical inputs to lake ontario embayments

    Received for publication August 20, 2007. There is considerable interest in understanding the role of land use in controlling surface water quality. This study was conducted to assess the role of land cover in regulating temporal and spatial patterns in nutrients and major solutes in rivers that drain into Lake Ontario. Water samples were collected monthly from 22 river sites in subwatersheds of ...

  • Cooperation of locals and stakeholders on environmental problems of lakes in Sindh, Pakistan

    1. INTRODUCTION: Since irrigation system had not been introduced in Sindh at that time Indus River had delta and eco-region upto Rohri and Sukkur and simultaneously, numerous tributaries and two main inundated canals such as Nara and main Nara Valley were developed on left and right sides parallel of Indus River which flooded entire fertile lands and forest area The tributaries and both ...


  • Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation

    With much scientific uncertainty about the real impact of new products and technologies, policy-makers face difficult decisions, particularly when they have to deal with powerful commercial interests and economic trade-offs. The back stories of some widely used innovations of the past, such as leaded petrol, mercury products, DBCP pesticide, vinyl chloride, DDT, tobacco, and fossil fuel energies ...

  • Phosphorus composition in sediments from seven different trophic lakes, China: A Phosphorus-31 NMR study

    Information on the chemical composition of sediment phosphorus (P) is fundamental to understanding P dynamics and eutrophication in lake ecosystems. In this study, the surface (10 cm) sediments were collected from seven lakes representing two contrasting ecological areas in China: the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River region and the Southwestern China Plateau. Phosphorus in these ...

  • Climate Change, Flow Regulation and Land-Use Effects on the Hydrology of the Peace-Athabasca-Slave System; Findings from the Northern Rivers Ecosystem Initiative

    The Northern Rivers Ecosystem Initiative (NREI) was established in the late 1990s to address important science questions resulting from previous studies undertaken by the Northern Rivers Basin Study (NRBS). This manuscript summarizes the results from a number of reports on hydrologic research conducted on the Peace-Athabasca-Slave river and lake systems. Specific concerns expressed by the NRBS ...


    By Springer

  • Dissolved oxygen measurements in aquatic environments: The effects of changing temperature and pressure on three sensor technologies

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is probably the most important parameter related to water quality and biological habitat in aquatic environments. In situ DO sensors are some of the most valuable tools used by scientists and engineers for the evaluation of water quality in aquatic ecosystems. Presently, we cannot accurately measure DO concentrations under variable temperature and pressure conditions. ...

  • Tracking the fate of ancient carbon in the Siberian Arctic

    The Siberian Arctic is one of the most remote and pristine corners of the planet. During the brief summer season, temperatures can climb into the 90s Fahrenheit, and the seemingly endless expanse of boreal forest — or taiga — and tundra explodes with plant and animal life. Every summer since 2008, R. Max Holmes and colleagues from the Woods Hole Research Center have brought a growing ...


    By Ensia

  • The Potential of Solar-Powered Water Circulators to Help Solve Serious Water and Energy Problems in the U.S.

    With increasing human populations comes the corresponding increased need for improving water quality in lakes, wastewater ponds, potable water reservoirs, and other water storage facilities. Providing circulation within water reservoirs of all types has long been known to provide meaningful benefits, but the costs to achieve sufficient circulation through diffused aeration or mechanical mixers ...


    By Medora Corporation

  • Stormwater treatment area 3/4

    Restore the Everglades That's the task the Florida Legislature set for the South Florida Water Management District. But how? Decades of development had eliminated the sheet flow of water from Lake Okeechobee. Densely populated cities and a 700,000-acre agricultural area, drained by 1,500 miles of canals and levees, now lay between the lake and the Everglades. Wetlands have disappeared. ...


    By Burns & McDonnell

  • Ecological Risk Assessment

    In recent years, ecological risk assessment (ERA) has emerged as an important part of environmental protection programs. The following discussion provides a brief overview of ERA issues. What is ecological risk assessment? Ecological risk assessment is the practice of determining the nature and likelihood of effects of our actions on animals, plants, and the environment. ...

  • Effects of mechanical harvest plus chipping and prescribed fire on Sierran runoff water quality

    Received for publication September 14, 2007. Fire suppression in Sierran ecosystems creates a substantial wildfire hazard and may exacerbate nutrient inputs into Lake Tahoe by allowing the buildup of O horizon material, which serves as a source for high N and P concentrations in runoff water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of biomass reduction using cut-to-length mechanical ...

  • To build a sustainable world, academics need to tear down the Ivory Tower

    Avoiding societal collapse means building bridges between science and the rest of the world. Until recently, Earth was so big compared with humanity’s impacts that its resources seemed limitless. But that is no longer the case. Thanks to rapid growth in both human population and per capita consumption, we are now on the edge of irrevocable damage to our planetary life ...


    By Ensia

  • Algal blooms: What are they?

    Algal blooms are also known as marine blooms or water blooms, and are actually a sudden increase in the population of algae in water scenery. Algal blooms usually take place in freshwater, such as lakes and water reservoirs as well as in marine milieus. They can be easily identified by coloration of the water ensuing from the high density of pigmented cells. Though many types of algae can form ...


    By LG Sonic

  • Suburban sprawl doesn’t have to be ecologically devastating

    As development gobbles up open space, conservationists take a fresh look at subdivisions with biodiversity in mind. Fort Collins, Colo., is a growing, vibrant college town with a typical American problem: Beyond its idyllic historic city center, cookie-cutter subdivisions are eating away at farm fields, ranches and forests. According to the ...


    By Ensia

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