marine biology Articles

  • Lipophilic contaminants in marine mammals: review of the results of ten years' work at the Department of Environmental Biology, Siena University (Italy)

    Organochlorine contaminants (HCB, DDTs and PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were valuated in three Mediterranean cetaceans: the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), and in three Argentinean pinnipeds: the southern sea lion (Otaria flavescens), the South American fur seal (Arctocephalus ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • IBioIC Announces Recipients Of £3 Million In Funding For Synthetic Biology Projects

    On October 17, 2016, the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC) announced over £3 million in investments over six synthetic biology projects. IBioIC was founded by Ingenza Ltd, GlaxoSmithKline plc (GSK), and INEOS to connect academic expertise in synthetic biology with industrial capabilities from businesses in ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Microbial Biodiversity Detection And Monitoring Using Molecular Biology Tools

    Micro-organisms are responsible for the most biogeochemical cycles that shape the environment of earth and its oceans. So far, only part of these organisms has been well studied, especially those living on earth and more considered from an anthropogenic perspective, e.g causing human diseases or providing useful products and services. Further the inability to generate pure culture has hampered ...


  • The Ecosystem Approach To Marine Planning and Management

    Keywords: ecosystem management, marine spatial planning, Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009, marine protected areas (MPAs) Provisions for marine planning form a key component of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 and the planning process has already commenced in some parts of the country. A book on The Ecosystem Approach to Marine Planning and Management is therefore timely. The ...


  • Biological effects of contaminants on marine organisms: the contribution of biotechnology

    One aspect of ecotoxicology concerns the effects of contaminants. Work on this area in the marine field is recent but useful for numerous applications, such as toxicological tests, the evaluation of organism response and the development of networks for the measurement of pollutant effects. In this context, the contribution of biotechnologies and technical advances in modern biology is important. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Interviews: Ken Buesseler, Researcher into marine discharges at Fukushima

    We as scientists do have a responsibility and I hope to be able to contribute in some way“ Ken Buesseler, researcher at the Wood Hoods Oceanographic Institute is investigating the radioactivity leaked from the Fukushima nuclear power station, initially from data facilitated by the TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) and then from samples gathered in situ. He believes that official bodies ...

  • Molecular analysis of vibrio cholerae o1, o139, non-o1, and non-o139 strains: clonal relationships between clinical and environmental isolates

    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Jagathy, Thiruvananthapuram 695 014, India; Center for Marine Biotechnology, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Baltimore, Maryland 212022; Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 207426; School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, 01246-904, São Paulo, Brazil; Department of ...

  • Greening of the coasts: a review of the Perna viridis success story

    The green mussel Perna viridis has been receiving a lot of attention from workers working in the research areas of intertidal ecology, aquaculture, pollution monitoring, biofouling, zoogeography and invasion biology. P. viridis is a remarkable species in terms of its ability to reach very high biomass levels, to withstand environmental fluctuations, to concentrate a variety of organic and ...


    By Sweco Nederland BV

  • Predicting the impacts of climate change on the evolutionary adaptations of polar fish

    The recognition of the important role of the polar habitats in global climate changes has awakened great interest in the  evolutionary biology of the organisms that live there, as well as the increasing threat of loss of biological diversity and depletion of marine fisheries. These organisms are exposed to strong environmental constraints, and it is important to understand how they have adapted ...


    By Springer

  • Stationary Spiraling Eddies and Self-Cleaning Processes in the White Sea in Presence of Climate Change and Their Relationship with Ecology of the Greenland Seal: Results of Airborne-Satellite-In Situ Study

    Pollution of the marginal Arctic seas and rising of toxic contaminants are extremely dangerous for marine and coastal ecosystems and for marine mammals as representatives of a high level of fodder chains in the ocean. Ecology of ice-associated forms of marine mammals, population health and animal welfare are strongly depended from the different environmental processes and phenomena. Operational ...


    By Springer

  • Simon Fraser University Opens Suite of Mass Spectrometers for Natural Products Discovery Research

    As a graduate student at the University of British Columbia, Dr. Roger Linington discovered his future life’s work serendipitously. While studying sponges, it became clear to him that one of the challenges in studying macroorganisms is their limited or slowly replenishing supply. To perform mechanism and mode-of-action studies, he needed a larger, more accessible source of ...


    By Waters Corporation

  • Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Measurement in Reclaimed Water

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is an emerging concern for wastewater reclamation and reuse communities since DON may react with disinfectants to form carcinogenic nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (DBP) (e.g., haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)) and to affect the speciation of currently regulated DBP (trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids). Also, DON is present in proteins that ...

  • Scientists, a new quota species?

    Globally, marine conservation is high on the agenda. The need to protect and conserve species and habitats from deleterious anthropogenic impacts has never been of more concern than it is currently. However, that is not to say we, as a society, are achieving effective marine conservation, in fact we are far from it. Global summits have come and gone, as have the targets they set for marine ...

  • Ocean science for sustainable development: Facts and figures

    Sarah Grimes explores why we need good ocean monitoring, how to get it, and why it still fails Small Island Developing States. Oceans are a critically important component of the Earth system, supporting ecosystem and human health. They regulate the weather and climate; are essential for producing freshwater; and soak up ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico draft 2008 Action Plan

    More than thirty years after the passage of the Clean Water Act, a large area of iow oxygen or hypoxia, absent most marine life and threatening to inexorably change the biology of the region, continues to form in the Gulf of Mexico during periods in the summer off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. The hypoxia is primarily caused by excess nutrients originating from the great productivity of ...

  • Will Rio+20 commit to protecting the oceans?

    Promises made at previous summits have not delivered enough protection for the oceans — campaigners are pushing for better results from Rio+20, writes Prime Sarmiento. This month, scientists, campaigners and many developing nations are optimistic they will set in motion a deal on the conservation of the high seas at ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • How we can save coral reefs (and why we should want to)

    As oceans grow warmer and more acidic, scientists are developing new strategies to rescue the “rainforests of the sea.” Coral reefs are among the most beautiful ecosystems on Earth — “a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet,” in oceanographer Sylvia Earle’s words. They also are extremely valuable. Reefs cover less than one-tenth of 1 percent of ...


    By Ensia

  • The number one thing we can do to protect Earth’s oceans

    Marine governance favors consumption and commerce over conservation. Here's what we can do about it. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the ...


    By Ensia

  • Why degraded reefs could be the future of ocean conservation

    When there’s not enough pristine habitat left to save an ecosystem, it’s time to take a new look at less-than-perfect places. When you think of a nature preserve, chances are you picture a tract of pristine, healthy wilderness, set aside in order to protect a functioning ecosystem. But what if not much remains of the ecosystem you want to protect? A new proposal by an ...


    By Ensia

  • For Thanksgiving, some positive environmental news to share around the table

    Thanksgiving is the one national holiday that has avoided being despoiled by excessive commercialization. It is a time when families and friends gather to appreciate one another and be thankful. But on the environmental front, we are constantly bombarded with stories of impending crises, environmental disasters, ecosystem collapse and species loss. Not only does this ...


    By Ensia

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