nuclear accident clean-up plan Articles

  • How Germany plans to succeed in a nuclear free, low carbon economy

    Germany has taken some fundamental energy decisions in recent months, ones that are interesting for other countries to study and learn from. The most “famous” decision recently has been to phase out nuclear power in the next ten years. This move builds on years of debate and a ...

  • U.S. Nuclear Power in Decline

    Nuclear power generation in the United States is falling. After increasing rapidly since the 1970s, electricity generation at U.S. nuclear plants began to grow more slowly in the early 2000s. It then plateaued between 2007 and 2010—before falling more than 4 percent over the last two years. Projections for 2013 show a further 1 percent drop. With reactors retiring early and proposed ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Questions and answers on the amended Nuclear Safety Directive

    What is new in the directive? The amended Nuclear Safety Directive strengthens the nuclear safety framework of the EU. The amendment reinforces the provisions of the existing directive. It: strengthens the role and independence of national regulatory authorities; introduces a high-level EU-wide safety objective, emphasizing accident prevention and ...


    By Europa Press Room

  • Asia-Pacific Analysis: Go green not nuclear

    Crispin Maslog says the region should follow the Philippines' lead and focus on renewable, not nuclear power. A year after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, questions remain over the role of nuclear power in the developing world, including ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Fukushima Meltdown Hastens Decline of Nuclear Power

    On May 5, 2012, Japan shut down its Tomari 3 nuclear reactor on the northern island of Hokkaido for inspection, marking the first time in over 40 years that the country had not a single nuclear power plant generating electricity. The March 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown shattered public confidence in atomic energy, thus far making it politically ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Determination and justification of the reference scenarios and associated source terms for emergency planning in Switzerland

    For the purpose of planning emergency countermeasures in a nuclear accident, realistic reference scenarios were defined on the basis of general plant features. Three types of scenario cover the accident sequences expected to be the most probable. Time-scales and releases are identical for all Swiss Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), although the plants differ in inventory, reactor type and age. The ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Hypothesising that salts of iodine, strontium and caesium reverse ageing induced by nuclear radiation

    Radiation accelerates ageing, producing telomere shortening, metabolic ageing, cell apoptosis, immunological decline, mitochondrial damage, free radical damage and oxidative stress. Salts of iodine, strontium and caesium may reverse ageing induced by nuclear radiation. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) has established that potassium iodide (KI) needs to be accessible to those within 50 miles ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Is nuclear power our energy future — or a dinosaur in a death spiral?

    Identical data yield drastically different conclusions about the role nuclear will play in meeting climate goals. Nuclear power is dead. Long live nuclear power. Nuclear power is the only way forward. Nuclear power is a red herring. Nuclear power is too dangerous. Nuclear power is the safest power source around. Nuclear is nothing. Nuclear is everything. It is now generally agreed ...


    By Ensia

  • Is `clean` coal possible?

    VANCOUVER, April 18, 2007 (GLOBE-Net) - Coal is the world’s most commonly used fuel to produce electrical energy, and will continue as such for some time. Yet it is one of the ’dirtiest’ of all fossil fuels. It is a major source of toxic air pollutants and the leading source of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. Many believe ’clean coal’ technologies will improve the energy efficiency of ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Ionising Radiation

    Introduction The energy level of some types of radiation is high enough so that when they interact with matter they cause the formation of electrically charged particles or ion-pairs and break molecular bonds. These so-called ionising radiations are by their nature potentially harmful to life; at high doses they can be lethal and at lower doses can cause genetic damage. Ionising radiation occurs ...

  • Managing compliance: Going beyond ‘Be Prepared’

    The recent earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan have prompted companies around the globe to re-examine their emergency response strategies. While some companies have comprehensive emergency response strategies in place, others just now are taking the steps necessary to review possible threats, analyze potential impacts and create expanded versions of their existing plans. If a company ...


    By 3E Company

  • Energy support measures and their impact on innovation in the renewable energy sector in Europe

    Governments support energy production and consumption in order to meet social, economic and environmental objectives, and they have been doing so for decades. In times of economic crisis, public budgets and household incomes come under pressure. At the same time, countries need to kick‑start their economies by creating new employment opportunities in emerging industries such as the ...

  • Meeting the world’s growing energy needs - a strategic perspective

    Clarence P. Cazalot, Jr., President & CEO of Marathon Oil Corporation, participated in a CEO Dialogue on The Future of Energy at GLOBE 2010. The focus of that Dialogue was on Leadership in the energy sector, which is perhaps more vital than in any other industrial sector in the global transformation to a lower-carbon economy. This article is a concise overview of the points Mr. Cazalot made ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Water infrastructure security against Al Qaeda`s revenge for the death of Bin Laden

    On May 2, 2011, the United States (U.S.) President Barack Obama announced that the U.S. forces killed Osama Bin Laden, the world's most dangerous terrorist leader that killed approximately 3000 Americans on September 11, 2011 (9/11) terror attacks. Currently, the U.S. intelligence is in possession of valuable materials of Al Qaeda operations (Thomas, 2011). Terrorist attack plots include water ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Canada as an Energy Superpower- A Concept Revisited

    There have been many references over the past decade calling Canada an “energy superpower”. Apart from the political debate the term has engendered, many see the label more as a marketing ploy than as a statement of reality. There is no doubting Canada is a ‘super producer’ of energy, ranking among the five largest energy producers in the world, behind China, the United ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • A Cost-Effective Approach to Explosion Consequence Modeling

    Failure to identify and mitigate explosion hazards is a persistent cause of industrial accidents, impacting sites ranging from fertilizer storage facilities to refineries. While some explosion consequence assessments are performed to comply with regulatory requirements or industry-specific process safety standards, in many cases the potential for loss of life and property damage is overlooked ...

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