occupational medicine Articles

  • Biological responses in low-dose range

    Out of the wealth of biological responses a few have been selected for discussion, namely, those which point to sensitive cellular reactions with possible consequences, or, those which might be promising in occupational medicine as indicators of a possible burden to persons, radiological or nuclear workers, and which might be used in the future as a routine laboratory technique in assessment of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Radiobiology worker risk assessment using stress indicators and proteomics

    Radiology is an essential technology in medicine and is used for organ diagnosis, radio–tracing and radiotherapy. The risks for the radiobiology workers have not been assessed sufficiently because measuring instruments fail to detect very low doses. This paper presents an investigation on the potential risks for radiobiology workers, due to the occupational exposure to low doses of irradiation. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Ayurvedic potentials for cellular protection, regeneration and immunomodulation with special reference to resistance against low radiation

    The exposure to acute low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) at more than 10 rem or 0.1 Sv due to background radiation, occupation exposure or free radicals appears to be responsible for biological changes that have a health impact on cells, including DNA damage and contribute to the ageing process and to the manifestation of diseases, including cancer. Individuals and subpopulations (cultural groups ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Preconcentration of cadmium using amberlite xad-4 prior to atomic absorption spectrometery

    Heavy metals can be considered as a unique class of environmental toxicant. They occur and persist in nature and most of them are advantageous to humans because of their vast usages in different industries, agriculture, and medicine. However, they may pose health hazards to the public because of their presence in air, water food chains as well as to the workers engaged in mining, smelting, alloy, ...


    By University of Tehran

  • Regulation of Nanoscale Materials under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Nanotechnology, loosely described as creating or using materials or processes at a scale of approximately one to one hundred nanometers (a nanometer is one billionth of a meter, or 10-9 m) in at least one dimension, is a rapidly-growing technology being used in virtually all major industrial sectors, including electronics, medicine, coatings, consumer products, aerospace, and specialty materials. ...

  • Is Hexavalent Chromium (Hex Chrome; Chrome VI) a carcinogen?

    In 1990, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an agency of the World Health Organization (WHO), published their findings on chromium and chromium compounds as carcinogens.  Chromium may be isolated in any of three volume states: Chrome 0 or metallic chromium; Chrome III called “Chrome 3” or Chrome VI called “Chrome 6,” also called hexavalent ...


    By Atlantic Environmental, Inc.

  • Safeguarding workers abroad

    Despite huge advances in information and communications technology, UK residents made more than nine million journeys abroad for work last year- up 12% since 2004.A generation ago, a whiff of glamour surrounded the planes and trains used by the business traveller. But today, corporate travel has less cachet and people recognise it can be an unhealthy, and sometimes downright dangerous, business. ...


    By LexisNexis

  • Gas Detection and Monitoring Systems

    In greenhouse applications, the accurate measurement of a number of environmental parameters such as carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, light intensity, water, humidity, pH and nutrient levels using sophisticated sensors is used to create a controlled environment for optimising plant growth rates while minimising energy usage. Carbon dioxide concentration is also one of the best ...


    By Edinburgh Instruments Ltd

  • Clean goes green

    Her daughter's eyes were pink and puffy. The child's nose was scratchy and runny. Nancy Figueroa of Jamaica Plain did everything she could to make her daughter well: She bought one medicine after another; did more wash than a 24-hour laundromat; gave to charity her daughter's stuffed animals that might be carrying dust, including the little monkey that young Katherine clung to for comfort. Still ...

  • New Measures to Protect Workers from Heat Stress in China

    Work system to control heat exposure It is stipulated in the Measures that working time under high temperature shall be controlled by employers, unless exceptional cases of damaging life & property security and public interest exist. When the temperature reaches 40°C, outdoor work shall cease. When it stands at 37°C to 40°C, outdoor work shall not exceed more than ...


    By SGS

  • New study links air pollution and early death in the U.K.

    Researchers find car exhaust causes more premature deaths than car accidents. Written by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office.You can read the original new in MIT NewsIn a study appearing this ...

  • UVC approach stops mold, enhances IAQ for medical firm

    Though mold problems in buildings are often associated with humid, tropical climates, mold can occur virtually anywhere — even in our most northern states. At Medicine Lake Properties, a commercial building in Plymouth, MN, mold-related IAQ issues were causing problems in one of the office suites. The 3,500-sq-ft suite is leased to a medical company that uses the space for administrative ...


  • Mold! Hazard or Hoax?

      Let me address the two issues in reverse order.  The Hoax The biggest hoax is the hysteria over the notorious black mold that grows on sheetrock.  This black mold is formally known as Stachybotrys chartarum or Stachybotrys atra.  The horror stories ...

  • Portable lead analyzer to locate source of lead

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the sources of lead in the environment in children with elevated blood, with the help of a Field Portable X-Ray ...

  • Blower Door Pressure Testing, Unvented Attics and Florida Homes

    I recently traveled to theCaribbean on a building science investigation. A large multi-national corporation owns several homes there for local executives. These homes had been plagued with dampness and mold growth problems for several years.  After several attempts to correct these problems, IET was called in, as we had ...

  • Tiny materials in countless products raise big questions for environment and health

    Nanotechnology opens a universe of possibilities — but also creates a world of unknowns. In recent years, efforts to develop the Next Big Thing — whether in medicine, computer technology, pollution prevention or high-performance materials — have turned to some really, really small things: nanomaterials. Working at the ...


    By Ensia

  • Ionising Radiation

    Introduction The energy level of some types of radiation is high enough so that when they interact with matter they cause the formation of electrically charged particles or ion-pairs and break molecular bonds. These so-called ionising radiations are by their nature potentially harmful to life; at high doses they can be lethal and at lower doses can cause genetic damage. Ionising radiation occurs ...

  • Managing effective workforce well-being programs across your organization

    Introduction The commitment to well-being is a challenge for global business leaders, who see workplace well-being as one of the most pressing challenges to their future growth and profitability. Well-being is increasingly considered a core focus for companies to unlock value across workforces and supply chains. Corporate well-being programs are increasingly designed with a ...


    By Rivo Software Ltd.

  • What are we doing to our children’s brains?

    Environmental chemicals are wreaking havoc to last a lifetime The numbers are startling. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1.8 million more children in the U.S. were diagnosed with developmental disabilities between 2006 and 2008 than a decade earlier. During this time, the prevalence of autism climbed nearly 300 percent, while that of ...


    By Ensia

  • Sick-building syndrome and building-related illness

    Significant health problems linked to very poor indoor air qualityIndoor Air Quality (IAQ) deals with the content of interior air that could affect health and comfort of building occupants. The IAQ may be compromised by microbial contaminants (mold, bacteria), chemicals (such as carbon monoxide, radon), allergens, or any mass or energy stressor are more prevalent than anyone could have predicted. ...

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