ocean acidification Articles

  • Shellfisheries: Time to prepare for ocean acidification

    Both physical and social factors must be considered as coastal communities brace for an uncertain future. Oceans are gradually becoming warmer and more acidic as more carbon dioxide enters the atmosphere — two shifts that are altering the economic foundations of many coastal regions. In a ...


    By Ensia

  • Ocean acidification investigations in the Kiel Fjord

    Continuous, reliableand direct pCO2measurements since 2012 Greenhouse gases, and in particular carbon dioxide (CO2), are one of the most discussed topics in society today, influencing political debate, legal framework and business decision-making. From a pre-industrial 280ppm, atmospheric CO2 has risen to a present-day level of 390ppm, with this figure expected to rise to up to 1000ppm by the ...


    By Teledyne RD Instruments

  • Ocean Acidification: A Litmus Test for International Law

    Ocean acidification, the changing chemistry of the oceans as a result of the absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, is caused by the atmospheric pollutant that is also the main driver of anthropogenic climate change, having effects on the marine environment as serious as other pollutants entering the oceans. However there is no discernible pressure for a new regime to address the ...


    By Lexxion, The Legal Publisher

  • Is pH a red herring when it comes to ocean acidification?

    New research points to saturation state, not pH, as the most pressing metric to track when it comes to shellfish survival. In 2007, the owners of Whiskey Creek oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast lost almost all of their larvae — and had no idea why. The only clue was that the larval die-offs often occurred during intense upwelling events, when ...


    By Ensia

  • Surface Ocean Acidification studies using Ships Of Opportunity

    Ships of Opportunity Ships of opportunity (SOOP) are used as a platform for cost-efficient collection of environmental data, Ferrybox. The SOOP network operated by NIVA cover the majority of the Norwegian coastline (from Germany (54N ) in the South to Svalbard (78N) in the North. This network is used in the national OA monitoring program. Globally, SOOPs are used for pCO2 measurements and ...


    By Franatech GmbH

  • Impact of surface ocean acidification on the CO2 absorption rate

    The rising level of atmospheric CO2 and consequently the acidification of the surface ocean affect the CO2 absorption rate. However, there are no mathematical models to describe the impacts of acidification on the rate of CO2 absorption. Therefore, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Managing oceans with sound science

    Management of marine resources for sustainable development needs local capacity for science, particularly in the Pacific region. Those who care about environmental damage and its effects on the health and welfare of communities tend to focus on land-based threats. That is where harm can be most easily observed, and where its causes — from agricultural pesticides to industrial air ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Will Rio+20 commit to protecting the oceans?

    Promises made at previous summits have not delivered enough protection for the oceans — campaigners are pushing for better results from Rio+20, writes Prime Sarmiento. This month, scientists, campaigners and many developing nations are optimistic they will set in motion a deal on the conservation of the high seas at ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Infographic: Why even landlubbers need healthy oceans

    Oceans around the world face a fierce array of threats: plastic pollution, overfishing, ...


    By Ensia

  • Ocean science for sustainable development: Facts and figures

    Sarah Grimes explores why we need good ocean monitoring, how to get it, and why it still fails Small Island Developing States. Oceans are a critically important component of the Earth system, supporting ecosystem and human health. They regulate the weather and climate; are essential for producing freshwater; and soak up ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • “We continue to be stunned at how rapidly the ocean is warming.”

    Oceans have been absorbing more of global warming’s heat and energy than would normally be expected, helping to slow rates of warming on land. But how long will that last? Probing a blue abyss can be an abysmal recipe for the blues. For every 10 joules of energy that our greenhouse gas pollution traps here on Earth, about 9 of them end up in an ocean. ...


    By Ensia

  • Environmental impacts of ocean-energy systems: a life-cycle assessment

    Ocean-energy technologies — which harvest renewable energy from the sea — will have a significant role to play in a future low-carbon society. A recent life-cycle analysis of different ocean-energy devices has found that life-cycle environmental impacts are caused mainly by the materials used in the mooring, foundations and structures. Improving the efficiency and lifespan of the ...

  • The number one thing we can do to protect Earth’s oceans

    Marine governance favors consumption and commerce over conservation. Here's what we can do about it. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the ...


    By Ensia

  • How levels of acidity can affect aquatic ecosystems

    We already know that the pH of water can have detrimental effect on human health, and can be affected by a number of different factors including: residue from volcanic ...


    By AQUAREAD Limited

  • Expanding marine protected areas to restore fisheries

    After World War II, accelerating population growth and steadily rising incomes drove the demand for seafood upward at a record pace. At the same time, advances in fishing technologies, including huge refrigerated processing ships that enabled trawlers to exploit distant oceans, enabled fishers to respond to the growing world demand. In response, the oceanic fish catch climbed from 19 million tons ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • How we can save coral reefs (and why we should want to)

    As oceans grow warmer and more acidic, scientists are developing new strategies to rescue the “rainforests of the sea.” Coral reefs are among the most beautiful ecosystems on Earth — “a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet,” in oceanographer Sylvia Earle’s words. They also are extremely valuable. Reefs cover less than one-tenth of 1 percent of ...


    By Ensia

  • New monitoring technology helps reveal Arctic secrets

    A group of Arctic researchers has employed the latest monitoring technology to investigate the effects of climate change, by measuring temperature and salinity in the water column beneath surface ice. The results of the investigation, which utilised YSI’s new 'Castaway-CTD', could cast new light on our understanding of the ways in which shifting ocean currents impact upon the climate in ...

  • A global setting for European environmental monitoring — measuring what we must manage. EEA International conference, 13-15 May 2009. key conclusions

    Meeting statement Worldwide observation systems deliver regular products based on comprehensive data sets of high quality. They provide society with indispensable services for the sustainable management of Earth"s resources. There is a clear need to intensify efforts to increase the sustainability, coordination, quality, integration integration, extent and operational capabilities of ...

  • Marine and coastal environment

    Although not always immediately apparent, our wellbeing as humans is affected by the environmental state of our seas, because many aspects of our lives benefit from the goods and services provided by well-functioning marine and coastal ecosystems. These ecosystem services offer a multitude of opportunities to provide an income for people for instance through production of fish and shellfish for ...

  • Calcium Carbonate, a solution to the energy crisis!

    A 'chemical' solution exists to solve jointly the energy crisis and CO2 release. Thanks to the Lime, “Cycle C4” could produce liquid fuels (petrol, diesel, etc.) with no CO2 release. The cycle presents no technological uncertainty, each step is widely known and controlled. Profitable with a barrel quote at 100 dollars. In 2004, the International Energy Agency annual report predicted that oil ...


    By Itgium

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