ocean current measurement Articles

  • Ocean carbon: A dent in the iron hypothesis

    Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the ...

  • What will it take to get plastics out of the ocean?

    From drones to filters to artificial islands, innovators are working to reduce the threat thousands of tons of trash pose to marine ecosystems. A few palm trees stand strong in the salty breeze. Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards ...


    By Ensia

  • Ocean science for sustainable development: Facts and figures

    Sarah Grimes explores why we need good ocean monitoring, how to get it, and why it still fails Small Island Developing States. Oceans are a critically important component of the Earth system, supporting ecosystem and human health. They regulate the weather and climate; are essential for producing freshwater; and soak up ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Time to stop losing ocean data to vandalism

    More must be done to prevent damage of ocean data buoys that costs money, vital data — and lives, say Sidney Thurston and M. Ravichandran. The global community relies on a rapidly expanding ocean observing network to understand the climate and ecosystems, to help warn against ocean-borne hazards such as tsunamis and storm surges caused by cyclones, and to support sea rescue ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • NASA Science Zeros in on Ocean Rise: How Much? How Soon?

    Seas around the world have risen an average of nearly 3 inches since 1992, with some locations rising more than 9 inches due to natural variation, according to the latest satellite measurements from NASA and its partners. An intensive research effort now underway, aided by NASA observations and analysis, points to an unavoidable rise of several feet in the future. Members of NASA's new ...

  • The number one thing we can do to protect Earth’s oceans

    Marine governance favors consumption and commerce over conservation. Here's what we can do about it. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the ...


    By Ensia

  • Estimating longitudinal dispersion in rivers using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    Abstract The longitudinal dispersion coefficient (D) is an important parameter needed to describe the transport of solutes in rivers and streams. The dispersion coefficient is generally estimated from tracer studies but the method can be expensive and time consuming, especially for large rivers. A number of empirical relations are available to estimate the dispersion coefficient; however, ...


    By Teledyne RD Instruments

  • The Ecological Fishprint of Nations: Measuring Humanity’s Impact on Marine Ecosystems

    In November, 2006, a prominent team of ecologists and economists issued this dire warning: if current fishing patterns continue, all major commercial fish species will suffer population collapses by ...


    By Redefining Progress

  • Water quality simulation of sewage impacts on the west coast of Mumbai, India

    Most coastal cities use the ocean as a site of waste disposal where pollutant loading degrades the quality of coastal waters. Presently, the west coast of Mumbai receives partially treated effluent from wastewater treatment facilities through ocean outfalls and discharges into creeks as well as wastewater/sewage from various open drains and nallahs which affect the water quality of creek and ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Shifting baselines in the Tijuana tide

    So last week I'm watching my oldest grom Israel (13) surf with Zach Plopper on the south side of the Imperial Beach pier. The surf is 2-4' with a south wind and sort of fun in a sloppy new south swell high tide sort of way. But then I smell it and see it--the infamous IB sewage plume. Not just a winter problem anymore--south wind and smell blows in sewage from the outfall pipe on the border and ...


    By WiLDCOAST

  • Coupled ADCPs can yield complete Reynolds stress tensor profiles in geophysical surface flows

    We introduce a new technique to measure profiles of each term in the Reynolds stress tensor using coupled acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The technique is based on the variance method which is extended to the case with eight acoustic beams. Methods to analyze turbulence from a single ADCP rely on questionable assumptions on turbulence anisotropy ratios and on the requirement of ...


    By Teledyne RD Instruments

  • Marine specimen banking: archive and pollution control for the 21st century

    The oceans have in the past been extensively used as disposal sites for various kinds of waste. The world ocean – being the final sink for many natural and anthropogenic substances – is a "labile" ecosystem, which is and has for a long time been the focal point of extensive interdisciplinary research. Measurements of heavy metals and a suite of various chemical compounds in the marine ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Mercury concentrations of a resident freshwater forage fish at Adak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska

    The Aleutian Archipelago is an isolated arc of over 300 volcanic islands stretching 1,600 km across the interface of the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean. Although remote, some Aleutian Islands were heavily impacted by military activities from World War II until recently and were exposed to anthropogenic contaminants, including mercury (Hg). Mercury is also delivered to these islands via ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Expanding marine protected areas to restore fisheries

    After World War II, accelerating population growth and steadily rising incomes drove the demand for seafood upward at a record pace. At the same time, advances in fishing technologies, including huge refrigerated processing ships that enabled trawlers to exploit distant oceans, enabled fishers to respond to the growing world demand. In response, the oceanic fish catch climbed from 19 million tons ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Interviews: Ken Buesseler, Researcher into marine discharges at Fukushima

    We as scientists do have a responsibility and I hope to be able to contribute in some way“ Ken Buesseler, researcher at the Wood Hoods Oceanographic Institute is investigating the radioactivity leaked from the Fukushima nuclear power station, initially from data facilitated by the TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) and then from samples gathered in situ. He believes that official bodies ...

  • New monitoring technology helps reveal Arctic secrets

    A group of Arctic researchers has employed the latest monitoring technology to investigate the effects of climate change, by measuring temperature and salinity in the water column beneath surface ice. The results of the investigation, which utilised YSI’s new 'Castaway-CTD', could cast new light on our understanding of the ways in which shifting ocean currents impact upon the climate in ...

  • Valuing Plastic – The Case for Business Action

    Concern is growing over the threat that widespread plastic waste poses to marine life, with conservative estimates of the overall financial damage of plastics to marine ecosystems standing at US$13 billion each year, according to two reports released last week at the first United Nations Environment Assembly. The eleventh edition of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Year Book looks ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Geotube Shoreline Protection Prevents Damage To NASA Site - Case Study

    Almost a mile of Geotube units are helping relaunch the beach at Wallops Flight Center in Virginia. In the fall of 2006, Hurricane Ernesto and the resulting gale force tropical storms on the East Coast caused serious beach erosion to Wallops Island, Virginia. Aggressive winds and rains severely damaged the beaches, and consequently, posed a threat to the adjacent launch pad at NASA's ...

  • We need a global treaty on plastics. Here’s what it should look like.

    Plastic pollution is more than an ocean problem, and it’s time we treat it as such. Plastics have boosted our economy because they are versatile, cheap and durable. Yet, thanks to these same traits, in the course of establishing a US$750 billion global industry, we have ...


    By Ensia

  • Cultural world heritage threatened by climate change

    From the Statue of Liberty in New York to the Tower of London or the Sydney Opera House – sea-level rise not only affects settlement areas for large parts of the world population but also numerous sites of the UNESCO World Heritage. This is shown in a new study by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck and Anders Levermann from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. ...

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