ocean data Articles

  • Time to stop losing ocean data to vandalism

    More must be done to prevent damage of ocean data buoys that costs money, vital data — and lives, say Sidney Thurston and M. Ravichandran. The global community relies on a rapidly expanding ocean observing network to understand the climate and ecosystems, to help warn against ocean-borne hazards such as tsunamis and storm surges caused by cyclones, and to support sea rescue ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Managing oceans with sound science

    Management of marine resources for sustainable development needs local capacity for science, particularly in the Pacific region. Those who care about environmental damage and its effects on the health and welfare of communities tend to focus on land-based threats. That is where harm can be most easily observed, and where its causes — from agricultural pesticides to industrial air ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Ocean carbon: A dent in the iron hypothesis

    Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the ...

  • Shellfisheries: Time to prepare for ocean acidification

    Both physical and social factors must be considered as coastal communities brace for an uncertain future. Oceans are gradually becoming warmer and more acidic as more carbon dioxide enters the atmosphere — two shifts that are altering the economic foundations of many coastal regions. In a ...


    By Ensia

  • Will Rio+20 commit to protecting the oceans?

    Promises made at previous summits have not delivered enough protection for the oceans — campaigners are pushing for better results from Rio+20, writes Prime Sarmiento. This month, scientists, campaigners and many developing nations are optimistic they will set in motion a deal on the conservation of the high seas at ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Acceptance angle effects on the beam attenuation in the ocean

    Abstract The beam attenuation serves as a proxy for particulate matter and is a key parameter in visibility algorithms for the aquatic environment. It is well known, however, that the beam attenuation is a function of the acceptance angle of the transmissometer used to measure it. Here we compare eight different transmisso meters with four different acceptance angles using four ...


    By Sequoia Scientific, Inc.

  • Ocean science for sustainable development: Facts and figures

    Sarah Grimes explores why we need good ocean monitoring, how to get it, and why it still fails Small Island Developing States. Oceans are a critically important component of the Earth system, supporting ecosystem and human health. They regulate the weather and climate; are essential for producing freshwater; and soak up ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Is pH a red herring when it comes to ocean acidification?

    New research points to saturation state, not pH, as the most pressing metric to track when it comes to shellfish survival. In 2007, the owners of Whiskey Creek oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast lost almost all of their larvae — and had no idea why. The only clue was that the larval die-offs often occurred during intense upwelling events, when ...


    By Ensia

  • Surface Ocean Acidification studies using Ships Of Opportunity

    Ships of Opportunity Ships of opportunity (SOOP) are used as a platform for cost-efficient collection of environmental data, Ferrybox. The SOOP network operated by NIVA cover the majority of the Norwegian coastline (from Germany (54N ) in the South to Svalbard (78N) in the North. This network is used in the national OA monitoring program. Globally, SOOPs are used for pCO2 measurements and ...


    By Franatech GmbH

  • What will it take to get plastics out of the ocean?

    From drones to filters to artificial islands, innovators are working to reduce the threat thousands of tons of trash pose to marine ecosystems. A few palm trees stand strong in the salty breeze. Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards ...


    By Ensia

  • “We continue to be stunned at how rapidly the ocean is warming.”

    Oceans have been absorbing more of global warming’s heat and energy than would normally be expected, helping to slow rates of warming on land. But how long will that last? Probing a blue abyss can be an abysmal recipe for the blues. For every 10 joules of energy that our greenhouse gas pollution traps here on Earth, about 9 of them end up in an ocean. ...


    By Ensia

  • Lead from gasoline discovered in Indian Ocean

    Levels began to climb in the 1970s, peaking a decade ago — a timeline consistent with the region’s pattern of leaded gasoline use. Written by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office.You can read the original new in MIT NewsSince the 1970s, leaded gasoline has been slowly phased out ...

  • NASA Science Zeros in on Ocean Rise: How Much? How Soon?

    Seas around the world have risen an average of nearly 3 inches since 1992, with some locations rising more than 9 inches due to natural variation, according to the latest satellite measurements from NASA and its partners. An intensive research effort now underway, aided by NASA observations and analysis, points to an unavoidable rise of several feet in the future. Members of NASA's new ...

  • How listening to the ocean can help reveal environmental damage

    In 2013, Katherine Indeck listened to recordings of sounds made in a channel between the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa Bay, Florida. Some of the audio files had been collected in 2005 during an unusually severe red tide, a bloom of toxic algae that killed fish, dolphins and sea turtles. Other recordings were made after the ecosystem began to recover. During the recovery years, Indeck could hear sounds ...


    By Ensia

  • Less Than 3 Percent of Oceans in Marine Parks Despite Recent Growth

    In May 1975, rising concerns about overfishing and deteriorating ocean health prompted scientists and officials from 33 countries to meet in Tokyo for the first global conference on marine parks and reserves. Noting the need for swift action to safeguard more of the sea, the delegates were unanimous in calling for the creation of a global system of marine protected areas (MPAs)—zones ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Molecular genetic variation in tarpon ( Megalops atlanticus Valenciennes) in the northern Atlantic Ocean

    The tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) is a highly valued game fish and occasional food fish in the eastern and western Atlantic Ocean. Tarpon have a high capacity for dispersal, but some regional biological differences have been reported. In this study we used two molecular genetic techniques—protein electrophoresis of nuclear DNA loci, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the ...


    By Springer

  • Ocean outfall plume characterization using an autonomous underwater vehicle

    A monitoring mission to map and characterize the Point Loma Ocean Outfall (PLOO) wastewater plume using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was performed on 3 March 2011. The mobility of an AUV provides a significant advantage in surveying discharge plumes over traditional cast-based methods, and when combined with optical and oceanographic sensors, provides a capability for both detecting ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Variability of seasonal and annual rainfall in the River Nile riparian countries and possible linkages to ocean–atmosphere interactions

    Variability analyses for the rainfall over the Nile Basin have been confined mostly to sub-basins and the annual mean of the hydroclimatic variable based on observed short-term data from a few meteorological stations. In this paper, long-term country-wide rainfall over the period 1901–2011 was used to assess variability in the seasonal and annual rainfall volumes in all the River Nile ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Simulating the Holocene climate evolution at northern high latitudes using a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model

    The response of the climate at high northern latitudes to slowly changing external forcings was studied in a 9,000-year long simulation with the coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE. Only long-term changes in insolation and atmospheric CO2 and CH4 content were prescribed. The experiment reveals an early optimum (9–8 kyr BP) in most regions, followed by a 1–3°C ...


    By Springer

  • Visualizing the stories data can tell

    Scientists and technologists are turning numbers about everything from condors to ocean-floor contours into visual representations of environmental issues. We’re living in an era of Big Data, but too often it’s nothing more than a fire hose of numbers and data sets that most would have difficulty understanding. Increasingly, though, entities such as non-governmental ...


    By Ensia

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