sediment treatment Articles

  • Sedimentation Processes

    Sedimentation is the process of allowing particles in suspension in water to settle out of the suspension under the effect of gravity. The particles that settle out from the suspension become sediment, and in water treatment is known as sludge. When a thick layer of sediment continues to settle, this is known as consolidation. When consolidation of sediment, or sludge, is assisted by mechanical ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • In Situ Sediment Treatment Using Activated Carbon: A Demonstrated Sediment Cleanup Technology

    This paper reviews general approaches for applying activated carbon (AC) amendments as an in situ sediment treatment remedy. In situ sediment treatment involves targeted placement of amendments using installation options that fall under two general approaches: 1) direct application of a thin layer of amendments (which potentially incorporate weighting and/or binding materials) to surface ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Seven Ways Your Facility Isn’t Meeting Effluent Regulations and How to Solve Them

    Whether you own, operate, or help manage a municipal or industrial facility that deals with wastewater, it’s important to understand how wastewater treatment can play a significant role in the overall health of your business, especially when it comes to meeting effluent regulations. This is an important part of the wastewater treatment process to consider, as ignoring it could earn your ...


    By SAMCO Technologies, Inc.

  • In Situ Physical/Chemical Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of in situ treatment is that it allows soil to be treated without being excavated and transported, resulting in potentially significant cost savings. However, in situ treatment generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in soil and aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the ...

  • Peroxy-acid treatment of selected PAHs in sediments

    In an attempt to address some of the disadvantages of the common biotic and abiotic processes used for the degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), an alternative strategy utilising a primary chemical oxidative step to be combined with a biological post-treatment step was created. The degradation of α-methylnaphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Inorganics in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The most commonly used treatment technologies for inorganics in soil, sediment, and sludge include solidification/stabilization (S/S), excavation and off-site disposal, and acid extraction. These treatment technologies are described briefly below. Solidification processes produce monolithic blocks of waste with high structural integrity. The contaminants do not necessarily interact chemically ...

  • In situ treatment of canal sediments case study

    The Problem Rivers and waterways have traditionally been the focus of industrial construction and commerce. Throughout the world, cities have grown and flourished on the banks of major inland waterways. Additionally, major industrial development has focused on these same inland waterways. These waterways provided and continue to provide a cost effective transportation system for ...


    By Nordevco Associates Ltd.

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Fuels in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for fuels in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, incineration, SVE, and low temperature thermal desorption. Incineration is typically used when chlorinated SVOCs are also present with fuel, and not specified for fuel-only contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be used to remediate soils: ...

  • In Situ Thermal Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of in situ thermal treatment is that it allows soil to be treated without being excavated and transported, resulting in significant cost savings. However, in situ treatment generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in soil and aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the process is ...

  • Ex Situ Biological Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of ex situ treatment is that it generally requires shorter time periods than in situ treatment, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to homogenize, screen, and continuously mix the soil. However, ex situ treatment requires excavation of soils, leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and ...

  • Ex Situ Thermal Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of ex situ treatments is that they generally require shorter time periods, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to screen, homogenize, and continuously mix the soils. Ex situ processes, however, require excavation of soils leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and materials handling worker ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Radionuclides in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Unlike organic contaminants (and similar to metals), radionuclides cannot be destroyed or degraded; therefore, remediation technologies applicable to radionuclides involve separation, concentration/volume reduction, and/or immobilization. The most commonly used treatment technology for radionuclides in soil, sediment, and sludge is solidification/stabilization (S/S). This treatment technology is ...

  • In Situ Biological Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of in situ treatment is that it allows soil to be treated without being excavated and transported, resulting in potentially significant cost savings. However, in situ treatment generally requires longer time periods, and there is less certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the variability in soil and aquifer characteristics and because the efficacy of the ...

  • Containment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Containment treatments are often performed to prevent, or significantly reduce, the migration of contaminants in soils or ground water. Containment is necessary whenever contaminated materials are to be buried or left in place at a site. In general, containment is performed when extensive subsurface contamination at a site precludes excavation and removal of wastes because of potential hazards, ...

  • Bioremediation Technologies for Marine Sediments

      USA – Baltic International Symposium on Advances in Marine Environmental Research, Monitoring and Technologies. Klaipeda, Lithuania. June 15-17, 2004 Global commerce relies heavily on waterborne transportation. Innovative, economical and environmentally sound ways to manage ...


  • Former MGP Site Required a Sediment Treatment and Erosion Protection Solution

    A shoreline revetment and sediment capping project along the Collins Cove coast of Beverly, Massachusetts required an erosion solution. The Challenge: Trying to maintain a system that will prevent loss of soils in a dynamic coastal environment is always challenging. As in most erosion control applications the revetment is intended to protect the underlying geotextile. In this particular ...


    By CETCO

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Halogenated SVOCs in Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Common treatment technologies for halogenated SVOCs in soil, sediment, and sludge include biodegradation, dehalogenation, incineration, and excavation with off-site disposal. All types of biodegradation, both in situ or ex situ, can be considered to remediate soils: in situ bioremediation, bioventing, composting, controlled solid phase, or landfarming. Slurry phase biological treatment is also ...

  • Common Treatment Technologies for Nonhalogenated VOCs in Soil, Sediment and Sludge

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE), thermal desorption, and incineration are the presumptive remedies for Superfund sites with nonhalogenated VOC-contaminated soil. Because a presumptive remedy is a technology that EPA believes, based upon its past experience, generally will be the most appropriate remedy for a specified type of site, the presumptive remedy approach will accelerate site-specific ...

  • Ex Situ Physical/Chemical Treatment for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    The main advantage of ex situ treatment is that it generally requires shorter time periods than in situ treatment, and there is more certainty about the uniformity of treatment because of the ability to homogenize, screen, and continuously mix the soil. Ex situ treatment, however, requires excavation of soils, leading to increased costs and engineering for equipment, possible permitting, and ...

  • Ultrasonic treatment for quantification of bioavailable phosphorus in soils and suspended sediments

    Several bioassays and chemical extraction methods have been proposed to quantify bioavailable phosphorus (BAP), but procedural and theoretical limitations have hindered their use. In this paper, we developed a method for P extraction from agricultural soil and suspended sediment by combining ultrasonic treatment with extraction by 0.1 molL−1 NaOH solution. The extraction process is less ...


    By IWA Publishing

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