soil respiration rate Articles

  • Laboratory test system to measure microbial respiration rate

    This study reports a sensible, accurate and economic method for continuous measuring microbial respiration. The measuring principle is an open system, with a continuous air-flow through. Evolved CO2 is absorbed and precipitated as carbonate by a Ba(OH)2 solution, causing a stoichiometrical decrease in ionic strength of the solution and in electrical conductivity. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Bioremediation with compost of a diesel contaminated soil: Monitoring by dehydrogenase activity and basal respiration

    The effect of compost on hydrocarbon degradation was determined during a 120-d incubation period. An evaluation of soil basal respiration and dehydrogenase activity as a monitoring instrument for the bioremediation process of soil contaminated with commercial diesel-oil was carried out. Six soil samples were used: S (control, uncontaminated soil), CS (contaminated soil), CSS (contaminated and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Effects of heavy metal pollution on the soil microbial activity

    The effects of heavy metals on soil microbial processes were investigated over a period of six weeks. Analytical grade (Sigma) sulphate salts of copper, zinc and nickel were added individually and in combinations to soil samples and incubated in different plastic pots. Samples were taken from the pots forthnightly and the rates of microbial carbon and nitrogen mineralization, microbial biomass ...

  • Lichens show that fungi can acclimate their respiration to seasonal changes in temperature

    Five species of lichens, the majority members of a soil-crust community (Cladonia convoluta, Diploschistes muscorum, Fulgensia fulgens, Lecanora muralis, Squamarina lentigera) showed seasonal changes of temperature sensitivity of their dark respiration (DR) to such an extent that several substantially met the definition of full acclimation, i.e. near identical DR under different nocturnal ...


    By Springer

  • Soil-mixing effects on inorganic nitrogen production and consumption in forest and shrubland soils

    Abstract Soils that are physically disturbed are often reported to show net nitrification and NO3 – loss. To investigate the response of soil N cycling rates to soil mixing, we assayed gross rates of mineralization, nitrification, NH4+ consumption, and NO3 – consumption in a suite of soils from eleven woody plant communities in Oregon, New Mexico, and Utah. Results ...


    By Springer

  • Impact of organic residues on soil microorganisms

    It is well known that organic residue amendments to soil give beneficial effects such as provision of plant nutrients, increased humus content and thereby increased water holding capacity, improved structure and increased cation exchange capacity. Organic wastes can be a valuable fertiliser in terms of phosphorous. Chemical precipitation in the sewage treatment plant makes sewage sludge rich in ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • The Role of Soil Moisture on our Climate, Weather and Global Warming

    Global warming is a topic that has received much attention in the media, especially during the hot days of summer. The process by which carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere prevents the escape of thermal energy into outer space is known as the greenhouse effect. The higher the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere the less thermal energy that can escape thus an increasing ...

  • Application of different organic wastes on soil properties and wheat yield

    Fresh and composted organic wastes [beet vinasse (BV), sewage sludge (SS), and a cotton gin crushed compost (CCGC)], were applied for 4 yr to a Typic Xerofluvent in dryland conditions near Seville, Spain. Organic wastes were applied at rates of 5, 7.5, and 10 Mg organic matter ha–1, respectively. The effect on the soil's physical properties, soil microbial biomass, and six soil enzymatic ...

  • Bioventing

    Introduction Bioventing is a promising new technology that stimulates the natural in situ biodegradation of any aerobically degradable compounds in soil by providing oxygen to existing soil microorganisms. In contrast to soil vapor vacuum extraction, bioventing uses low air flow rates to provide only enough oxygen to sustain microbial activity. Oxygen is most commonly supplied through direct air ...

  • Microbial community structure and functioning along metal pollution gradients

    Toxic effects of heavy metals on soil microorganisms have been confirmed in a number of laboratory studies. However, most real‐field studies do not allow for strong general conclusions due to a range of problems, such as pseudoreplication and confounding factors, which are almost impossible to control for with the most commonly used polluted‐vs.‐unpolluted or random sampling designs. Effects ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Soil carbon dynamics and carbon budget of newly reconstructed tall-grass prairies in south central Iowa

    Received for publication February 16, 2009. In addition to their aesthetic and environmental qualities, reconstructed prairies can act as C sinks and potentially offset rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. The objective of this study was to quantify C budget components of newly established prairies on previously cultivated land. Net ecosystem production (NEP) was estimated using a C budgeting ...

  • Regional Patterns in Carbon Cycling Across the Great Plains of North America

    The large organic carbon (C) pools found in noncultivated grassland soils suggest that historically these ecosystems have had high rates of C sequestration. Changes in the soil C pool over time are a function of alterations in C input and output rates. Across the Great Plains and at individual sites through time, inputs of C (via aboveground production) are correlated with precipitation, however, ...


    By Springer

  • Rushing Remediation - Cometabolic bioremediation accelerates natural degradation of groundwater and soil contaminants

    Untitled Document Field studies have shown that many organic contaminants degrade naturally by microorganisms present in soil and groundwater. This naturally occurring bioremediation, known ...


    By CL Solutions, LLC

  • Terrestrial sequestration

    Trees play a key role in the environment's natural landscape due to their ability to prevent erosion. The Spanish Government says it will plant 45 million trees over the next four years to counter desertification caused by global warming. The massive tree–planting scheme aims to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, the cause of global warming. It estimates that in the long ...


    By Erosion Control Forum

  • Effect of high solids concentration on hydrodynamics and mass transfer of a three-phase airlift reactor for marine sediment bioremediation

    The more restrictive limits for environmental pollution control imposed nowadays require the development of new biological technologies. Multiphase reactors including slurry reactors have become reactors of choice for chemical and biochemical applications. In the present work, three-phase airlift reactors are proposed as an alternative to mechanically stirred systems and slurry bubble columns for ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • The advantages and benefits of aerobic cometabolism

    Aerobic metabolism yields the energy-transferring molecule TPA at a much higher rate than anaerobic metabolism. The higher energy yield produces a greater viable population. The oxygenase enzymes involved in the cometabolism of chlorinated solvents are not induced by the presence of contaminants, so a high microbial population has a proportionately high yield of oxygenase enzymes. Aerobic ...


    By CL Solutions, LLC

  • Dust monitoring

    Generally, two different approaches are used to measure the amount of dust deposited on a surface; Determination of the soiling of a surface, by a change in its properties; Determination of the quantity of dust deposited, by weight. WHAT IS DUST? Dust is a generic term used to describe fine particles that are suspended in the atmosphere. Dust comes from a wide variety of sources, including soil, ...


    By Queensland Laboratory

  • Is Water RunOff Effecting my Pond?

    What is Water RunOff? Runoff is precipitation that did not get (infiltrated) absorbed into the soil, or did not evaporate, and therefore made its way from the ground surface into places that water collect. Runoff causes erosion, and also carry chemicals and substances on the ground surface along to the ponds, lakes and rivers where the water ends up. ( ...


    By Keeton Industries, Inc.

  • Water pollution · Canarina DESCAR software

    Natural waters contain micro-organism as well as solutes. There is a distinction between ‘pure’ water, meaning water that is fit to drink and pure water that is a single substance. A water pollutant is a substance that prevents the use of water for a specified purpose. The signs of polluted water are obvious. Poor drinking water tastes and smell bad. ...

  • Understanding and Monitoring Hydrocarbons in Water

    Untitled Document 1. Introduction Oil contamination continues to be a very hot topic, due largely in part to recent catastrophic events with shipping ...


    By Arjay Engineering Ltd.

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