soil subsidence Articles

  • Subsidence of Peat Soils – Flooding Risk in South-East Asia

    There is an increase in awareness of the carbon emissions resulting from peatland drainage and peat fires. There is in general however a lack of recognition link between carbon loss and peatland subsidence, i.e. lowering of the soil surface. In the tropics the process of subsidence after drainage is very fast due to high temperatures. Flood risks are also more severe because of high ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Subsidence of peat soils in South-East Asia – Flooding risks in Sarawak

    There is an increase in awareness of the carbon emissions resulting from peatland drainage and peat fires. There is in general however a lack of recognition of the link between carbon loss and peatland subsidence, i.e. lowering of the soil surface. This paper presents the case study of the Rajang Delta in Sarawak, Malaysia where peatland subsidence will cause flooding, rendering 50% and ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Data Requirements for Soil, Sediment, and Sludge

    Site soil conditions frequently limit the selection of a treatment process. Process-limiting characteristics such as pH or moisture content may sometimes be adjusted. In other cases, a treatment technology may be eliminated based upon the soil classification (e.g., particle-size distribution) or other soil characteristics. Soils are inherently variable in their physical and chemical ...

  • Soil quality, local communities and the territorial context: Exploring a latent nexus?

    Soil degradation is increasingly threatening Mediterranean–type ecosystems and the interplay between natural and anthropogenic factors affects (and is in turn influenced by) soil quality. Rural areas with poor soils are characterised by a socioeconomic profile featuring poverty, unemployment and subsidence agriculture. These factors may trigger, in the long term, a downward spiral leading to soil ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Flooding of lowland peatlands in Southeast Asia

    Vast lowland areas of Southeast Asia will be frequently and irreversibly flooded before the end of the century unless action is taken to stop the destruction of peatlands. A radical change in land-use is needed. In particular the palm oil and pulp wood sectors must stop developing new plantations on peat and plan to phase-out existing drainage-based plantations before they are flooded. If no ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Environmental and social impacts of oil palm cultivation on tropical peat

    The palm oil sector has created in the past few decades millions of jobs. Over the next decade, the Indonesian government plans to double the annual production of palm oil, creating new jobs for an estimated 1.3 million households. Although the cultivation of oil palm on peatlands creates new income opportunities for many farmers in the short term, longer term economic implications remain ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Once you drained it, you risk losing it all!

    Peatlands have been recognised for their high carbon storage and their potential to emit a huge amount of carbon emissions once they are drained. Their annual carbon emissions of 2 billion tonnes are a paramount issue in the global effort to mitigate climate change. However, the perilous and far-reaching consequences from peat drainage activities are not limited to ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Rajang Delta threatened by floods

    This paper presents a case study of the Rajang Delta in Sarawak, Malaysia where peatland subsidence will cause flooding, rendering more than half of the Rajang Delta unsuitable for any agriculture cultivation due to severe floods in 50 years. The land area which will be inundated is 3 times the size of Singapore!! What a great loss! Case study summary: The case study reveals that ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Practical guidance for implementing RSPO Principles & Criteria in relation to peatlands

    This manual provides guidance to oil palm growers to adjust their planning and practices according to the new RSPO Principles and Criteria related to peatlands. These specific requirements address the issues of greenhouse gas emissions, soil subsidence and peat fires resulting from peatland drainage for oil palm cultivation. Some requirements relate to existing plantations on peat and others are ...


    By Wetlands International

  • A not-for-profit organization is changing the brownfield landscape in Toronto`s Don Valley

    Looking out over the green meadow beyond the old Brick Works factory, it’s hard to imagine it as the foundry full of bricks it once was. This is a space in transition, a remediation in progress. There are no more bricks out here, but there are plenty inside the 16 buildings on the industrial pad. A prosperous brickyard from 1889 to 1989, the Don Valley Brick Works had become a raver’s haven of ...


    By Actual Media

  • Thermal treatment of thick peat layers – DNAPL removal and shrinkage

    Abstract A PCE DNAPL source zone was treated using thermal conduction heating combined with multi-phase extraction. Thick peat layers, even when contaminated with PCE DNAPL, were remediated to average soil PCE concentrations of 0.17 mg/kg (99.6% reduction compared to starting levels). This was accomplished in 83 days of heating, by elevating the temperature to the boiling point of water, and ...


    By TerraTherm, Inc.

  • Bankers, what are the risks of your peatland investments?

    The world’s increasing demand for palm oil and pulp wood for paper production attracts the private sector to invest more and more in these businesses in Indonesia and Malaysia. But are banks, the creditors of these businesses, aware of the risks of their investments in palm oil and ...


    By Wetlands International

  • WaStop chosen to protect Forest View residents and property from flooding - Case Study

    Location: Forest View Customer: The Village of Forest View Problem: Originally Forest View had a combined sewer and stormwater system. As the area became popular development occurred which lead to more hard surface areas, which lead to higher runoff during rainy periods. This became such a problem that, in the 1960’s the sewer and ...


    By Wapro AB

  • Evaluating nonpoint source critical source area contributions at the watershed scale

    Areas with disproportionately high pollutant losses (i.e., critical source areas [CSAs]) have been widely recognized as priority areas for the control of nonpoint-source pollution. The identification and evaluation of CSAs at the watershed scale allows state and federal programs to implement soil and water conservation measures where they are needed most. Despite many potential advantages, many ...

  • The transition in Dutch water management

    Abstract  Over the past decades, the Dutch people have been confronted with severe water-related problems, which are the result of an unsustainable water system, arising from human interventions in the physical infrastructure of the water system and the water management style. The claims of housing, industry, infrastructure and agriculture have resulted in increasing pressure on the water ...


    By Springer

  • Divestments oil palm on peat has solid scientific basis

    In the Malaysia Chronicle of 17 January 2014, Sarawak Oil Palm Plantation Owners Association (Soppoa) mentions that there is no credible ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Next steps for RSPO in relation

    The new RSPO (April 2013) Principles and Criteria (P&C) require the avoidance of new plantation developments on peatlands and provide important guidance for addressing the issues related to the production of palm oil on peat. The new P&C acknowledge that drainage of peatlands results in greenhouse gas emissions and peat soil subsidence, which in turn create fl ooding problems. The new ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Using the Clean Development Mechanism to mitigate emissions from peatlands: “Avoided drainage” and “Rewetting” as new CDM activities

    Introduction Currently, the only land-use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) activities that are eligible under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) are afforestation and reforestation (A/R), which allow for the generation of credits by net removal by sinks. This could include afforestation and reforestation of wet organic soils (peatlands), e.g. with peatswamp forest tree ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Briefing paper: accelerating action to Save Peat for Less Heat!

    Emissions from drained and degrading peatlands (organic soils) amount to almost double the amount of CO2 emissions from aviation1, even when skyrocketing emissions from peat fires are not included. This briefing paper shows where the most urgent action is needed and presents a roadmap and policy recommendations for accelerating action. Peatlands cover only 3% of the global land surface. Some 15% ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Putting the carbon ahead of the drivers

    The round of applause at the end of the REDD+ negotiations in Bonn reflected the relief of the Parties at having concluded work on several difficult issues. But their efforts will not stop deforestation and forest degradation. After two weeks of  ...


    By Wetlands International

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