switchgrass Articles

  • Simulating the hydrologic response of a semiarid watershed to switchgrass cultivation

    The conversion of land from existing uses to biofuel cultivation is expected to increase given concerns about the sustainability of fossil fuel supplies. Nonetheless, research into the environmental impacts of biofuel crops, primarily the hydrological impacts of their cultivation, is in its infancy. To investigate such issues, the response of a 1,649 km2 semiarid basin to the incremental ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Yield and breakeven price of ‘Alamo’ switchgrass for biofuels in tennessee

    Research on how land suitability affects yields and breakeven prices for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown as a bioenergy crop is lacking for the U.S. Southeast. Data from a 3-yr multilocation experiment at Milan, TN, were analyzed to determine the influence of soil drainage and landscape position on switchgrass yield and farm-gate breakeven price. Plots were seeded in 2004 with ‘Alamo’ at ...

  • Simulating switchgrass growth and development under potential and water-limiting conditions

    Anticipating a demand for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as a source for biofuel production, a crop simulation model of this crop can be a component of a biofuel decision support system. The objective of this effort was to develop and test a model for switchgrass, based on robust empirical relationships between plant behavior and the environment. The model simulates date of annual growth ...

  • Upland switchgrass yield, nutritive value, and soil carbon changes under grazing and clipping

    There have been few evaluations of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) cultivars under multiple harvest managements in the northeastern United States. The objective of this study was to determine the yield, nutritive value, and soil C changes of switchgrass cultivars under grazing and clipping. In 1999, ‘Cave-in-Rock’, ‘Trailblazer’, and ‘Shawnee’ switchgrass were established in field plots at Rock ...

  • Bioenergy and land use: a spatial-agent dynamic model of energy crop production in Illinois

    To reduce dependence on foreign oil and natural gas and address concerns about climate change, the USA is increasingly developing renewable, domestic energy sources, notably biomass for the production of ethanol and biodiesel. Illinois, as one of the farming states of the Midwest, has significant potential to produce bioenergy crops. Land requirements place these crops in competition with ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Wisconsin-Based Utility Expands Green Energy Portfolio

    JUST as a wise investor maintains a diverse investment portfolio, a successful utility needs to make certain that it has a diverse portfolio of generation sources,” says Bill Johnson, manager of Agricultural Compliance for Alliant Energy, headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin. Alliant's generation portfolio includes 434 megawatts of renewable energy - enough to power over 110,000 homes. “With ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Current and future ethanol production technologies: costs of production and Rates of Return on invested capital

    Considering the production goals for cellulosic and advanced biofuels in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), this study compares production costs and returns on invested capital for two current and three proposed ethanol technologies. Two methods use corn grain as the feedstock, and three use cellulosic feedstocks of corn stover, switchgrass and wood chips. Baseline levels ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • EPA Anticipates That Sorghum Based Biofuels Could Qualify For RFS

    EPA announced that renewable fuels produced from sorghum biomass could qualify as cellulosic fuel under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). This is a result of a preliminary analysis of the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions resulting from the growth and transport of biomass sorghum feedstocks that are used to make biofuels. The analysis, which was conducted in response to a petition from the National ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Second-generation biofuels can reduce emissions

    Second-generation biofuel crops like the perennial grasses Miscanthus and switchgrass can efficiently meet emission reduction goals without significantly displacing cropland used for food production, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Illinois and collaborators published their findings in the inaugural edition of the journal Nature Energy. The researchers call it ...


    By University of Illinois

  • Peak Oil – Peak Opportunity?

    Possibility and public policies can harness renewable energy technologies for a bright future “Alternative” fuels are nothing new. In fact, they were the mainstream power source a century ago. Rudolph Diesel built his engine to run on peanut oil. Henry Ford designed the Model T to run on ethanol. Wind delivered a significant source of power in the last century. Cheap gasoline (and ...

  • Reducing the Economic Friction of Regulation

    Last month, we looked at two distinctly different bioenergy business models that are merging. Energy profit centers and waste cost-recovery facilities are learning the benefits of each other's business model. The resulting projects generate maximum revenue with lower production costs. The same kind of business model duality occurs in biomass energy regulation. There are more than two kinds of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commericalizing cellulosic ethanol

    Cellulosic biofuels, produced from nonfood feedstock, are expected to play a critical role in reducing the country's dependence on imported oil. EISA, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, calls for the production of 100 million gallons per year (mgpy) of cellulosic biofuels by 2010, with a longer term goal of 16 billion gallons by 2022.Achieving these goals will not be easy. Several ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Engineered wetland removes subsurface hydrocarbons while providing beneficial reuse

    British Petroleum (BP) is operating an engineered wetland to treat petroleum-contaminated groundwater at a 300-acre site in Casper, WY. Release of petroleum products during refinery operations from 1908 until 1991 resulted in significant petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. Over 44,000 yd3 of LNAPL were removed by dual-phase recovery wells and oil/water separators constructed in 1981, but ...

  • Compostable Plastics And Environmental Marketing Claims

    According to a bottled water survey conducted by Perception Research Services International (PRS) for Brand Packaging published in August 2011, where shoppers were interviewed in person to gain some insights on marketing claims, environmental and recycling messages were misunderstood and not even noticed by a majority of consumers interviewed. In fact, only 50 out of 200 shoppers even noticed the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Lean, green and clean: Integrating Sustainability into Business Strategy - DuPont

    The last thirty years have seen big changes in the attitude and approach of corporations to sustainability. From the conception of "siloed" environmental initiatives to the appointment of Chief Sustainability Officers, many companies have gone through a veritable revolution in moving from a compliance mind-set to proactive commitments aimed at reducing their environmental footprint. This is in ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • BioCycle world

    Composters and organics recyclers are encouraged to lend support to the U.S. Composting Council’s education campaign (See “Composting Council Advocates Carbon Offsets In Climate Change Bill,” BioCycle September 2009) by signing an online petition: http://www.petitiononline.com/uscc2009/petition.html. The Solid Waste Association of North America ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The search for sustainable plastics

    As petroleum-based polymers foul our oceans and litter our lives, researchers seek more environmentally friendly ways to meet demand for durable, versatile materials. The fate of the world’s oceans may rest inside a stainless steel tank not quite the size of a small beer keg. Inside, genetically modified bacteria turn corn syrup into a churning mass of polymers that can be ...


    By Ensia

  • How did palm oil become such a problem — and what can we do about it?

    Production of this ubiquitous ingredient is devastating for the environment. Solutions are complex, but they are out there. Last August, from the window of a jet high over Sumatra, I counted nearly a dozen plumes of smoke rising from the vast jungles and plantations below. Some more than a half-mile wide, they looked like pillars holding up the sky. That week the ...


    By Ensia

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